Opinion Drama

  • Train Your Baby Like a Dog review – dehumanising and indefensible
    by Chitra Ramaswamy on August 20, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    Animal trainer and behaviourist Jo-Rosie Haffenden uses controversial methods like clickers and treats to make children behave better. The results are troublingSouthern Spain. A rural location we will call, to use the correct overblown reality TV lingo, “an oasis of canine calm”. “Sit!” instructs Jo-Rosie Haffenden, an animal trainer, behaviourist and owner of a degree in human psychology and many spookily obedient creatures. Two beautifully trained bottoms go down. One belongs to Haffenden’s cocker spaniel. The other to her three-year-old son. “Good boy!” Haffenden says … to her son. It is a shocking sight.For Haffenden, what is really shocking is that we are not all using dog training on our children. She believes: “If everyone parented the way we train dogs, we would end up with more confident, compassionate and curious human beings.” She is willing to put her reputation on the line for it. Her controversial methods include using clickers and treats. She thinks that “kids are a lot more like dogs than people like to think”. Continue reading…

  • Trump renews support for Russia to rejoin G8 – live
    by Sabrina Siddiqui in Washington on August 20, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    President said it’s ‘much more appropriate to have Russia in’ days before annual G7 meeting Sign up to the US briefing and get a new perspective 9.00pm BSTDonald Trump defended Israel’s controversial decision to bar Representatives Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib from entering the country.The president also denied having any involvement in the matter, despite publicly pressuring the Israeli government not to let Omar and Tlaib, the first two Muslim women elected to the US Congress, visit the country. President Donald Trump blasts anti-Semitic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), and Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) pic.twitter.com/cIhfLgJr6XOh my ‍♀️ https://t.co/hChOjPAzHV 8.34pm BSTDonald Trump addressed a wide range of issues in his comments to reporters from the Oval Office, including trade talks with China, Russia and the G7 and Israel’s ban on Representatives Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib. Here are the top-lines: Continue reading…

  • County cricket: Essex win after bowling out Kent for 40 – as it happened
    by Tanya Aldred on August 20, 2019 at 7:52 pm

    Sam Cook took seven for 23 as Kent posted their lowest total at the St Lawrence ground but Essex only claimed victory by the skin of their teeth 8.45pm BSTA ridiculous match at Canterbury finished with Essex winning by three wickets to extend their lead at the top of Division One. Twenty-six wickets fell in the day as first Essex lost nine for 82, then Kent were bowled out for 40, their lowest total at the St Lawrence ground.Sam Cook grabbed seven for 23 – and 12 for 65 in the match. No Kent batsman could reach double figures. Chasing 153 to win, Essex made it by the skin of their teeth. The pitch liaison officer said “no blame” could be attached to the pitch. 7.50pm BSTWhat an incredible game at Canterbury!!! And what a day all round. Plenty to look forward to tomorrow too – with events at Edgbaston and Scarborough in particular looking promising. Thank you so much for all your comments and emails – I’m leaving you in Graham’s hands tomorrow as I’m off to La Belle France! See you in September. Good night! Continue reading…

  • New species of stegosaurus uncovered in Moroccan dig
    by PA Media on August 20, 2019 at 7:29 pm

    Scientists believe dinosaur dates back to 168m years ago during the middle Jurassic period A new species of one of the most recognisable types of dinosaur is also the oldest of its kind ever discovered, British scientists believe.Remains of a stegosaurus, an armoured dinosaur instantly recognisable by the plate-like bones protruding from its spine and spikes on its tails, were studied by a team from the Natural History Museum and belong to a new genus that walked the earth around 168m years ago. Continue reading…

  • Brazil’s Bolsonaro may drop plans to make son US ambassador amid backlash
    by Anna Jean Kaiser in Rio de Janeiro on August 20, 2019 at 7:22 pm

    Far-right president faced possible roadblock in senate after report pointed to nepotismBrazil’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, has signalled he may abandon controversial plans to make his son ambassador to the United States, amid a fierce political backlash and growing signs Congress may block the move.“I’m not going to subject my son to failure,” Bolsonaro told reporters on Tuesday in what was the first public hint he may be reconsidering his nomination. Continue reading…

  • French musician killed by bear in Canada
    by Leyland Cecco in Toronto on August 20, 2019 at 7:21 pm

    Julien Gauthier, 44, was on an expedition recording sounds of nature for his musicA French artist who used sounds of nature in his music has been killed by a bear in Canada.Friends said Julien Gauthier, 44, was the victim of an attack after a bear entered a camp near the village of Tulita, in the Northwest Territories, in the early hours of Thursday last week. The police have not yet publicly identified the victim. Continue reading…

  • Italian officials order migrant ship evacuated amid health fears
    by Lorenzo Tondo in Palermo on August 20, 2019 at 7:21 pm

    Condition of 83 migrants on Open Arms rescue vessel off Lampedusa at ‘worrisome levels’Italian prosecutors have ordered that 83 migrants onboard a charity vessel that has been anchored off the island of Lampedusa for 19 days must be immediately disembarked, citing the “explosive’’ psychological and medical condition of the passengers.The rescue ship, operated by the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, has been refused permission to dock by Italy’s far-right interior minister, Matteo Salvini. Continue reading…

  • Is James Bond about to die? What the new 007 title might mean
    by Stuart Heritage on August 20, 2019 at 7:13 pm

    The 25th outing for the superspy is called No Time to Die, which brings up a number of different theoriesIt has been a long road to get to the title of Bond 25. For a while the film was variously rumoured to be Eclipse (too generic), A Reason to Die (too much like low-hanging fruit for bored critics) and Shatterhand (too much like a worryingly graphic description of someone trying to manually catch their own diarrhoea). But now, finally, the truth is out. The next James Bond film will officially be called No Time to Die. Related: No Time to Die: 25th James Bond film gets a title Continue reading…

  • To Move in Time review – hypnotic tale of the time-traveller’s strife
    by Mark Fisher on August 20, 2019 at 7:00 pm

    Summerhall, EdinburghTim Etchells’ thought experiment doggedly asks what if you could go back and right the wrongs of your past?Tim Etchells is surely a master of the late-night pub conversation. Give him a thought experiment and watch him go. Here, in this hypnotic Forced Entertainment monologue, he plays with the question of what we would do if we could travel back in time. It is a game many of us have played – like imagining what we would do if we won the lottery – but few have pursued it with such dogged logic.It’s performed by a measured and unflappable Tyrone Huggins with a mixture of innocent inquiry and concern about the implications of his own thought processes. He starts, as many a pub conversation would, with the small changes he would make to prevent mistakes, accidents and disasters. If he could go back in time, he would visit scenes of historical importance or insert himself Zelig-like in to the background of famous photographs. Or maybe he would use the benefit of hindsight to make himself rich with a canny investment. Continue reading…

  • Bury on the brink of expulsion after fifth League One match is suspended
    by David Conn on August 20, 2019 at 6:49 pm

    • Club have until Friday to meet EFL’s financial deadline• Tranmere match off, Sheffield Wednesday awarded cup tieBury have now had five of their League One matches suspended this season after the English Football League postponed Saturday’s game at Tranmere.In a statement the EFL maintained its stance that Bury’s owner, Steve Dale, has not provided details of how the club are to pay their debts and fund the season. Continue reading…

  • CPS investigates GMP officers after man found unresponsive in police van
    by Amy Walker on August 20, 2019 at 6:47 pm

    Manchester officers could face criminal charges after Andre Moura was pronounced dead in hospital Five police officers are under investigation by the Crown Prosecution Service after a man was found unresponsive in a police van in Oldham and later pronounced dead in hospital.Andre Moura was found unresponsive in custody after being arrested in July 2018. Continue reading…

  • Steve Bell on Boris Johnson and the Brexit standoff – cartoon
    by Steve Bell on August 20, 2019 at 6:30 pm

    Continue reading…

  • Man arrested near immigration reporting centre in London
    by Ben Quinn on August 20, 2019 at 6:28 pm

    Police hold man on suspicion of possessing weapon and making threats, days after attack on civil servantA man has been arrested outside a Home Office building in London on suspicion of possession of an offensive weapon and making threats to kill.The incident comes days after a civil servant was attacked outside one of the department’s other premises in the capital. Continue reading…

  • David Beckham’s MLS stadium site contaminated by arsenic, says report
    by Associated Press on August 20, 2019 at 6:20 pm

    Soil samples found barium and lead levels above legal limitsFindings could hike cleanup costs to $50m at proposed siteAn environmental report poses a new problem for the proposed site of David Beckham’s Major League Soccer stadium in Miami: Tests show the soil is far more toxic than expected.According to the Miami Herald, the analysis found arsenic contamination reaching more than twice the legal limit and hazardous debris in surface-level soil samples at the Melreese golf course, where people have played for more than 50 years. The 131-acre site is being considered for a sprawling $1bn commercial and stadium complex that would be home ground for Beckham’s MLS team, Inter Miami. Continue reading…

  • Players’ union urges action on mental health after Kearnan Myall speaks out
    by Robert Kitson on August 20, 2019 at 6:03 pm

    • RPA says 10% of Premiership players phone helpline every year• Majority have mental health problems after retiring – surveyRugby’s players’ union has called for urgent action to be taken to protect players’ mental wellbeing following stark warnings from Kearnan Myall, the former Wasps and England Saxons forward.Myall’s compelling interview in the Guardian has set off alarm bells across the game and Damian Hopley, the chief executive of the Rugby Players’ Association, is increasingly concerned about the strain on modern players. Continue reading…

  • Fast bowlers have not hit a new peak – they’ve just reached a plateau | Andy Bull
    by Andy Bull on August 20, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    There is a school of thought that bowlers such as England’s Jofra Archer are bound to be faster now, simply because of the advances in sport science – reality suggests something differentAt 96mph the ball travels from the bowler to the batsman in the bat of an eyelid. Really. At that speed a batsman has around 0.4sec to play with which, most studies seem to agree, also happens to be how long it takes to blink. But that 0.4sec is only a fag-packet calculation. The true number would allow for the ball’s deceleration and its journey down into the pitch and up away from it, but still, we are dealing with the tiny margins, tenths and hundredths, that a batsman has to spot the length, the line, make up his mind, and then play a shot. So near the top of the accelerometer, cricket begins to seem almost physically impossible.At that speed strange things start to happen, for the batsman, the bowler, and the spectators. Time begins to both speed up and slow down, as though someone’s sitting on the remote. Our sense of it gets elastic. On Saturday Steve Smith, who, with his Heath Robinson batting technique, usually seems to have so much time to work in, was all of a sudden so short of it he could not even make it halfway through a shot before the ball was on him. And then when he fell, everything slowed right down again, as the crowd fell silent and minds filled with a flood of awful thoughts. Continue reading…

  • Growing up in air-polluted areas linked to mental health issues
    by Nicola Davis on August 20, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    Correlation found between poor air quality and disorders including schizophreniaPeople who spend their childhood in areas with high levels of air pollution may be more likely to later develop mental disorders, research suggests.Air pollution has become a matter of growing concern as an increasing number of studies have found links to conditions ranging from asthma to dementia and various types of cancer. Continue reading…

  • When the fringe is no joke: minding your mental health in Edinburgh
    by Rachael Healy on August 20, 2019 at 6:00 pm

    Performing at the festival can be a taxing experience. Objectively Funny has created a peer support network that turns attention offstageIt’s lunchtime in Edinburgh’s Old Town and I’ve swapped comedy for something more serious. On stage, psychotherapist Rachel O’Connor draws a picture of the brain while people in the room share stressful moments from the first fortnight of the fringe: flyers arriving late, nightmares about missing their own show. Soon, we are all releasing tension with some diaphragmatic breathing.While punters enjoy the buzz of the fringe, others often have a much tougher experience. Those working here deal with low wages, fragile living arrangements, long shifts and constant rejection. Performers face a potent mix of financial stress, pre-show anxiety, pressure to party, and the dread of a two-star review. Comedy production company Objectively Funny is working with O’Connor to provide support. Continue reading…

  • Labour told it may be ‘going backwards on equality’
    by Jessica Elgot Chief political correspondent on August 20, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    Criticism follows decision not to replace certain departing female MPs with all-women shortlistsLabour has been warned it could be “going backwards on equality” by two senior MPs who expressed their alarm at the decision not to replace some departing female colleagues with all-women shortlists.The concerns of Labour MPs Gloria De Piero and Harriet Harman follow criticism of the party’s procedures by the Unison general secretary, Dave Prentis, who accused the Labour leadership of “trading” seats intended for female candidates in order to allow “favourite sons” to take up the safest Labour seats. Continue reading…

  • Man was sleepwalking when he sexually assaulted woman, jury finds
    by PA Media on August 20, 2019 at 5:38 pm

    Judge says Dale Kelly may need treatment as jury finds he was not responsible for his actionsA 21-year-old man with a history of sleepwalking has been told he may need treatment after a jury found he was asleep when he sexually assaulted his friend’s girlfriend.Dale Kelly was found not guilty of sexual assault by penetration by reason of insanity after he sleepwalked into the couple’s bedroom, got into their bed and touched the woman intimately. Continue reading…

  • The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the EU: he cannot be serious | Editorial
    by Editorial on August 20, 2019 at 5:30 pm

    The PM’s letter to Donald Tusk is a reckless and detail-free approach to the new deal with Europe that he claims to wantIf there is any fragile encouragement to be squeezed out of Boris Johnson’s letter to the European Union this week, it is perhaps the fact that he wrote it at all. After four weeks of acting as if the EU does not exist, the existence of the letter is at least an implied recognition that the relationship with the EU matters. For nearly a month, Mr Johnson’s government has also promoted the fiction that a no-deal Brexit is an acceptable prospect for Britain. So when Mr Johnson starts his letter by saying that he very much hopes the UK will be leaving with a deal, it is just about possible to muster some carefully guarded optimism that he may actually mean it.Yet the content of what he wrote makes a mockery of any such conclusion. In fact it is difficult to see how Mr Johnson could have done less than he does in the letter to Donald Tusk. At the core of the letter is the statement that the Irish backstop is not viable. The letter then excoriates the backstop as undemocratic, a brake on UK trade and regulatory policy and a threat to the Northern Ireland peace process. In most respects, this is the opposite of the truth. In some ways it is downright mischievous. The letter is more like one of Mr Johnson’s fact-free and irresponsible newspaper concoctions than a serious diplomatic approach to solving an impasse that imminently threatens British economic stability, trade, jobs, constitutional cohesion and security. Continue reading…

  • EU rejects Boris Johnson request to remove backstop
    by Jennifer Rankin in Brussels and Jessica Elgot on August 20, 2019 at 5:29 pm

    Johnson says MPs who claim they can prevent no deal are to blame for hardline EU responseAll the day’s Brexit and politics news – live The European Union has rebuffed Boris Johnson’s attempts to tear up the Irish backstop, in a coordinated response that appeared to close the door on further meaningful Brexit negotiations.In remarks shortly before the prime minister departed for a whistle-stop tour to meet European leaders, Johnson put the blame for the EU’s hardline response at the feet of Conservative rebels, claiming his negotiating strategy was being undermined by those who said they could prevent no deal. Continue reading…

  • If you can’t abide Jeremy Corbyn, learn from the moral of Ed Miliband | Aditya Chakrabortty
    by Aditya Chakrabortty on August 20, 2019 at 5:29 pm

    A coalition making cuts, a Labour leader jeered as a zealot, a rabid rightwing press. But this time, the stakes are even higherIn that moment you could feel British politics lurching out of its rut. Labour was about to pick its next leader – and instead of choosing the favourite, the old Tony Blair tribute act, voters were throwing a giant spanner in the works. They wanted the slightly gawky leftwing underdog. They wanted a transformed party, a bigger politics. They wanted Ed Miliband.So much has changed this decade that it seems absurd to consider how at its start, in 2010, a 40-year-old father of two and whiz on a Rubik’s Cube was considered the biggest threat to the British establishment. Did that really happen? Yes, confirm the archives. He was Red Ed, a “Marxoid creep” (the Daily Mail, of course), the man with the sneaky plan to turn the country into some socialist banana republic. Continue reading…

  • Nasa mission to Jupiter moon Europa moves step closer to launch
    by Nicola Davis on August 20, 2019 at 5:16 pm

    Mission that could shed light on possibility of life on icy rock is expected to lift off in 2025A Nasa mission to explore the most tantalising of Jupiter’s 79 moons has been given the green light to proceed to the final stages of development.Europa – which is slightly smaller than our own moon – has long been considered a possible candidate in the hunt for alien life. Evidence suggests there is an ocean below the moon’s thick, icy crust that might be tens of miles deep. Scientists believe this body of water could contain the right chemical cocktail for life and could even be home to some form of living organisms. Continue reading…

  • Hugh Brogan obituary
    by Tony Badger on August 20, 2019 at 5:15 pm

    Leading historian of the US admired for his acclaimed biographies of Alexis de Tocqueville and Arthur RansomeHugh Brogan, who has died aged 83, came to reflect that when he wrote his bestselling Penguin History of the United States of America (1990, originally published by Longman in 1985) his work was suffused with a sense of optimism about the country’s future, for all its faults and despite Vietnam and Watergate. If he had been writing that history now, he felt that the book could not have been underpinned by that hopefulness.The Penguin history was a unique achievement. An older generation of British Americanists had written one-volume histories of the US, but they were brief interpretive essays designed to explain America to a British audience. Continue reading…

  • Mark Robinson steps down as coach of England Women after Ashes rout
    by PA Media on August 20, 2019 at 5:14 pm

    • Former Sussex coach guided team to 2017 World Cup victory• Assistant coach Alastair Maiden takes temporary chargeMark Robinson is to step down as the England Women’s coach after “a wonderful four years” ended with defeat in the Ashes.The 52-year-old former Sussex coach guided England to victory in the 2017 World Cup and to the final of last year’s Women’s T20 World Cup in the Caribbean but he was unable to get the better of Australia. England won only one of seven matches in the all-forms format. Continue reading…

  • Kevin MacDonald leaves Aston Villa following bullying investigation
    by David Conn on August 20, 2019 at 5:02 pm

    • Coach’s behaviour probed after complaint from Gareth Farrelly• Villa issue statement apologising to all former players affectedThe Aston Villa youth coach Kevin MacDonald has left the club “with immediate effect” following an investigation into allegations of bullying made by a number of former young players. Villa apologised to the former players affected by the behaviour of MacDonald, who was a youth and reserve team coach in two spells over a 25-year period from the mid-1990s, and Villa said his conduct “would not be tolerated by the club today”.The investigation, conducted by an independent barrister, Jack Mitchell, was initiated by the club’s chief executive, Christian Purslow, after the Guardian published an interview with the former Villa midfielder Gareth Farrelly in December. Continue reading…

  • Strong wind blows dozens of air mattresses through Denver park – video
    on August 20, 2019 at 5:00 pm

    Dozens of inflatable mattresses cartwheeled across a park in Denver, Colorado, on Saturday as strong winds whipped through the neighbourhood. Robb Manes, who filmed the bizarre spectacle, described it as the ‘great mattress migration of 2019’. According to local reports, the mattresses had been set out for an open-air film screening called the Bed Cinema later that day Continue reading…

  • Rights groups challenge UK police over mobile phone monitoring
    by Owen Bowcott Legal affairs correspondent on August 20, 2019 at 4:46 pm

    Activists seek to overturn ruling enabling police to avoid disclosing use of covert surveillance technologyThe refusal by police forces to disclose whether they are exploiting covert surveillance technology to track mobile phones is to be challenged at a tribunal next week.Privacy International, represented by lawyers for the civil rights organisation Liberty, will attempt to overturn a ruling allowing the Metropolitan police and seven other forces to “neither confirm nor deny” use of the controversial equipment. Continue reading…

  • No Time to Die: 25th James Bond film gets a title
    by Benjamin Lee on August 20, 2019 at 4:41 pm

    Latest 007 caper, directed by Beasts of No Nation’s Cary Fukunaga, is set to to be Daniel Craig’s last outing as the superspyIt has been revealed that the 25th James Bond film will be called No Time to Die.The news was announced via the franchise’s official Twitter feed and YouTube channel in a short video that sees star Daniel Craig walk onto screen. The latest 007 adventure has faced a number of problems throughout pre-production and during the shoot itself. Continue reading…

  • Bolton facing points deduction after postponing Doncaster match
    by Jamie Jackson on August 20, 2019 at 4:29 pm

    • League One club set to be referred to independent commission• Bolton facing another points deduction if guilty of misconductBolton face another points deduction from the EFL after unilaterally postponing Tuesday’s League One home game with Doncaster.“Welfare” concerns were cited regarding younger players being forced to play in all four games of the new season. Bolton went into administration in May and are prevented from signing new players. Continue reading…

  • Jeffrey Epstein: three more women sue financier’s estate
    by Martin Pengelly and agencies on August 20, 2019 at 4:27 pm

    Women say they were sexually abused by Epstein before and after a controversial plea deal in which he avoided federal prosecution for sex crimesThree more women sued the estate of Jeffrey Epstein on Tuesday, saying they were sexually abused by the financier both before and after the controversial deal that allowed him to avoid federal prosecution for sex crimes in 2007. Related: Prince Andrew urged to tell all he knows about Jeffrey Epstein Continue reading…

  • Brazilian police sniper kills bus hijacker in Rio de Janeiro
    by Reuters in Rio de Janeiro on August 20, 2019 at 4:13 pm

    All 37 hostages onboard hijacked bus on bridge across Guanabara Bay survive ordealBrazilian security forces have shot dead a man who hijacked a bus on a bridge across Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro and took nearly 40 people hostage.The hijacking began at about 5am on Tuesday when a masked man commandeered a commuter bus on the bridge, which connects Rio with the city of Niterói. The man took 37 people in the bus hostage before freeing six of them, officials said. Continue reading…

  • Cheesy pun crowned Scotland’s funniest tweet at Edinburgh fringe
    by April Curtin on August 20, 2019 at 4:08 pm

    The joke was deemed the best of Scottish Twitter by a panel of comedians, who picked it from a shortlist of witty observations and gagsIt is, quite literally, a cheesy pun. And it’s gained Marc Simpson the title of Scotland’s funniest tweet at this year’s Edinburgh fringe.Fighting off competition from other shortlisted Scots, Simpson’s prize-winning tweet reads: “wis walkin home n someone threw a block of cheese oot their windee n it hit me on the head, i turned n shouted that wisna very mature wis it” Continue reading…

  • Yakou Méïté: ‘People think they can say what they want, even if it’s racist’
    by Ed Aarons on August 20, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    The Reading striker was racially abused on social media after missing a penalty – and decided to publish the messagesEven 24 hours on Yakou Méïté is struggling to comprehend the events of Sunday afternoon. “I was happy because we had won but personally I was a bit upset after missing the penalty,” the Reading striker says of his side’s 3-0 win over Cardiff.“To see that message when I checked my phone afterwards made me very sad – it’s the first time I’ve ever experienced anything like that. To be honest for the first 30 minutes I think I was in a little bit of shock but then I realised it’s not everyone who is like this. Unfortunately there are some bad people who like sending messages like that but it’s important not to let it affect you.” Continue reading…

  • Albanian PM condemns ‘barbarian’ who chased tourists in viral video
    by Shaun Walker Central and eastern Europe correspondent on August 20, 2019 at 3:56 pm

    Tourism minister meets Spanish family after restaurant owner’s frenzied attackAlbanian authorities have moved to minimise the damage to the country’s reputation as an emerging tourist hotspot after a video of a furious restaurant owner pursuing a group of Spaniards and attempting to smash their car’s windscreen went viral.The incident took place last week in Porto Palermo in southern Albania. Video shot from inside a car rented by the Spanish tourists shows a man clinging to the bonnet and attempting to break through the windscreen with repeated blows. Continue reading…

  • ‘We need to survive’: Stevenage’s small business owners reveal Brexit fears
    by Frances Perraudin on August 20, 2019 at 3:45 pm

    From the greengrocer to the gift shop, residents brace for the prospect of crashing out of the EU“You see the melons over there?” said Ali Ahmed, pointing across his extensive display of fruit and vegetables at his greengrocer’s shop in Stevenage town centre. “They come from Spain. Most of the apples come from Poland. The tomatoes are from Holland.”Ahmed, who has been running Star Groceries for about five years, gets most of his fresh produce from New Spitalfields market. “We’ve spoken to the wholesaler and [if there is a no-deal Brexit] they say it’s going to be very, very, very hard. But we have no idea what’s going to happen. I don’t know what I can do. You can’t stock up on fresh fruit and veg, so I’m just hoping they get a deal. Continue reading…

  • Kristen Stewart’s new film is nothing like Alien – except for all the bits like Alien
    by Stuart Heritage on August 20, 2019 at 3:27 pm

    In the trailer for Underwater, Stewart runs around a dark base chased by a creature, but don’t for a moment think that it resembles a certain cult classicUnderwater is a forthcoming film where a lot of scared military-industrial workers led by a jaded short-haired female rush around a dingy-looking base, chased by a terrifying creature of unknown origin. But don’t for a moment think that it’s like Alien, because it is completely different in almost every way. Look, here’s the trailer. Let me show you. Continue reading…

  • Family of UK resident jailed in Iran urge No 10 to secure her release
    by Matthew Weaver on August 20, 2019 at 3:14 pm

    Relatives of Aras Amiri say sentence passed in May was upheld without a hearingThe family of a UK resident detained in Iran on spying charges have urged the UK government to do more to secure her release after a 10-year prison sentence against her was upheld without a hearing.Aras Amiri, 33, a British Council employee, was jailed in May, almost a year after she was arrested while visiting her ailing paternal grandmother in Tehran. Continue reading…

  • Why carbon offsetting is not the panacea Harry and Meghan might think it is
    by Emine Saner on August 20, 2019 at 3:04 pm

    Elton John claimed the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s private jet use was ‘carbon neutral’. The reality is more complicatedElton John has attacked the criticism of the use of private jets by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex – reportedly four journeys in 11 days – by saying he not only paid for the plane, but also paid to offset its giant carbon emissions. “We ensured their flight was carbon neutral,” he tweeted.The world of carbon offsetting flights – where you can pay to have the equivalent of your emissions “cancelled out” by projects that lower or remove emissions, such as reforestation or renewable energy – is not clearcut. While some argue it is better than doing nothing, others say it allows frequent flyers to assuage their guilt and the aviation industry to grow. Continue reading…

  • Facebook launches ‘clear history’ tool – but it won’t delete anything
    by Alex Hern on August 20, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    Feature ‘disconnects’ data from a user’s account and shows extent of tracking apparatusFacebook has launched its “clear history” feature more than a year after it was first promised by Mark Zuckerberg as part of damage control efforts after the Cambridge Analytica revelations.The new feature, part of a wider set of tools covering “off-Facebook activity”, will not delete anything from Facebook’s servers, instead simply “disconnecting” data from an individual user’s account. Continue reading…

  • Bring back Val! In praise of Bake Off’s older bakers, this year’s missing ingredient
    by Emma Beddington on August 20, 2019 at 2:59 pm

    The latest lineup includes the youngest ever assortment of bakers. We remember some of the most experienced and entertaining contestants of all time – from Howard to FloIt is a casting as hotly anticipated as Strictly, but with less sparkle and prurient speculation on potential couplings: the new Great British Bake Off lineup has been announced. That said, this year’s bakers are so young that the tent could well become a canvas-covered Love Island. With seven contestants in their 20s and the oldest, HGV driver Phil, a mere 56, the average age is 31, making it the youngest season by far. Will the delicate GBBO soufflé rise without the magic ingredient: older bakers?Previous seasons have seen contestants in their 60s and older triumph over patisserie pretenders young enough to be their grandchildren – but also, more importantly, bond with them in the loveliest way over split crème pat, deflated choux and Paul Hollywood’s ludicrous posturing. With its multigenerational flapping over pie crust and oven temperature, GBBO paints a picture of Britain we recognise: all ages and ethnicities, prey to anxiety and fond of a bun or six. Continue reading…

  • Was Simone de Beauvoir as feminist as we thought?
    by Kate Kirkpatrick on August 20, 2019 at 2:55 pm

    Seventy years after The Second Sex reinvented women’s liberation, her legacy has its contradictions – but it should not be overlookedSimone de Beauvoir is a feminist icon. She didn’t just write the feminist book, she wrote the movement’s bible, The Second Sex. She was an engaged intellectual who combined philosophical and literary productivity with real-world political action that led to lasting legislative change. Her life has inspired generations of women seeking independence, and this was largely attributed to her unconventional relationship with the philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, which seemed like a love that didn’t come at the cost of her freedom or professional success.But in the decades since Beauvoir’s death in 1986, several waves of previously unknown letters, diaries and manuscripts have shocked readers who thought they knew her. Her letters to her American lover, Nelson Algren, showed the depth of her passion for another man. Letters to Sartre revealed not only that she had lesbian relationships, but that her lovers were young and her students. There is no doubt now that she hid both significant professional successes and serious moral failings from the story she told in her autobiographies. So what are we to make of the author of The Second Sex, 70 years on from its publication? In light of what she didn’t tell us, was she as feminist as we thought? Continue reading…

  • Nuclear regulator permits restarting of reactor 4 at Hunterston B
    by Jillian Ambrose on August 20, 2019 at 2:55 pm

    EDF Energy is expected to restart reactor a year after it was shut down over safety concernsBritain’s nuclear watchdog has agreed to allow one of the country’s oldest nuclear reactors to restart, one year after it was shut down to investigate cracks in its graphite core.EDF Energy is expected to restart reactor 4 at its 40-year-old Hunterston B nuclear plant within weeks after the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) said the plant was safe. Continue reading…

  • Why emoji use could lead to more sex
    by Guardian Staff on August 20, 2019 at 2:46 pm

    A study claims that adding emojis to communications allowed people to reach a deeper level of intimacy with one anotherName: Sexy emojis.Appearance: Irresistible. Continue reading…

  • Apple accidentally reopens security flaw in latest iOS version
    by Alex Hern on August 20, 2019 at 2:41 pm

    Vulnerability could be exploited to gain control of iPhone, users are warnedApple users are being warned to exercise particular caution over their cybersecurity for the next few days, after the company mistakenly reopened a security flaw in the latest version of iOS.In iOS 12.4, released last month, Apple fixed a number of security bugs, as well as enabling support for the Apple Card in the US. But in doing so, the company accidentally reversed a security fix it had previously patched in iOS 12.3 at the end of April. Continue reading…

  • Donald Trump’s UK trade promises are hot air – his aim is Brexit chaos | Michael H Fuchs
    by Michael H Fuchs on August 20, 2019 at 2:23 pm

    If Boris Johnson seriously believes the US will shower rewards on Britain after leaving the EU he is mistakenAs the UK races towards a potential no-deal Brexit, President Donald Trump is cheering it on. But Brexit – especially without a deal in place with the European Union – would be bad for the US-UK special relationship and would make the UK a much less important US ally.The ramifications of Brexit – in particular without a deal with the EU that pleases everyone – could be explosive. It could hurt the UK economy at a time when Trump’s trade war and economic policies are increasing the risk of a global recession, and threaten the very integrity of the UK amid growing signals that Northern Ireland and Scotland would consider breaking away. Boris Johnson appears willing to drive Britain off this cliff come hell or high water, threatening a no-deal Brexit and saying that the UK will leave the EU by the end of October, “do or die”. Everyone hopes that the UK finds a way out of this mess, but the past few years haven’t provided much evidence to believe that it will end well. Continue reading…

  • Italian PM resigns with attack on ‘opportunist’ Salvini
    by Angela Giuffrida in Rome on August 20, 2019 at 2:19 pm

    Giuseppe Conte tells Italian Senate that far-right leader has triggered political crisis to serve his own interestsItaly and Salvini face uncertainty after PM’s resignationGiuseppe Conte has resigned as Italy’s prime minister after blasting Matteo Salvini, the leader of the far-right League, as an “opportunist” for triggering a government crisis that could have “serious consequences” for Italy.Conte said he would formally resign his mandate to the president, Sergio Mattarella, after the close of the debate in the Senate on Tuesday. Continue reading…

  • Pupils who take drugs, drink and smoke more likely to be unhappy
    by Haroon Siddique on August 20, 2019 at 2:04 pm

    NHS survey of children aged 11-15 also links substance use to stress and poor life satisfactionChildren in England aged 11 to 15 who have recently drunk, smoked cigarettes and taken drugs are more than twice as likely to say they feel low levels of happiness than their peers who have done none of those things, a large NHS Digital survey has found.Fifty-one percent of children who had recently drunk alcohol, smoked cigarettes and taken drugs said they had experienced low levels of happiness, compared with 22% who had done none of those things. Among those who had done one of those things, 36% reported having had a low level of happiness the previous day. Continue reading…

  • You can’t replace the GP with an algorithm – so don’t try to, Matt Hancock | Eleanor Morgan
    by Eleanor Morgan on August 20, 2019 at 1:35 pm

    The government wants to replace NHS health screening with AI. But for many people, face-to-face consultations are a lifelineThe health secretary has announced a proposed overhaul of NHS health screening that could scrap GP consultations for millions of people, replacing them with online programmes and AI. The idea is that the one-size-fits-all system for routine health MOTs offered to those over 40 has become old hat.Those between the age of 40 and 74 are currently called into their GP surgery every five years for checks on weight, cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure. This is to see whether patients are at risk of problems such as diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease and stroke. Now Matt Hancock says we need to be utilising technology and sophisticated data collection to direct help to those most in need. These changes may see in-person checks being reserved only for those deemed high risk, with everyone else expected to rely on predictive online algorithms. Continue reading…

  • ‘I want everyone to pay attention to me!’ Meet Catherine Cohen, comedy’s peak millennial
    by Brian Logan on August 20, 2019 at 1:33 pm

    Caught between self-love and neurosis, Cohen has taken Edinburgh by storm with a musical show that plays up to her generation’s stereotypes. She’s even got a song called Look At Me … ‘The other day I woke up, I was like, ‘This is the most magical place on Earth!’” The New York cabaret and comedy performer Catherine Cohen is rhapsodising about her maiden Edinburgh experience. “This was me: ‘I’m in the exact right place!’ I was gonna cry.” But the rhapsodies don’t last long. “Last night I was sobbing, I was like, ‘Why would anyone do this to themselves?!’ After this, nothing else will ever be as hard.”That’s a spot-on precis of the fringe rollercoaster, and it gives a vivid flavour of Cohen’s show The Twist… ? She’s Gorgeous, which may be the most eye-catching comedy hour on the fringe. Houston native Cohen, 27 – who performs a weekly cabaret at Alan Cumming’s club in Manhattan – is the millennial paradox made flesh, and set to music. She is a dazzling, ravening ego on legs: her signature song is called Look at Me and repeats the phrase ad absurdum. Her act is a dance of death between self-love and neurosis, sequinned and staged because, hey, make your downward spiral sexy enough and you might get enough likes to spin back up again. Continue reading…

  • Nile Rodgers: ‘Madonna was the one who told me to get dreadlocks’
    by As told to Leah Harper on August 20, 2019 at 1:32 pm

    The musician and producer talks about how he got his hands on his Brit awards suit and why he always wears a hat to dinnerI remember that when I first saw this suit, I thought it was absolutely stunning. I stopped dead in my tracks. It’s Kim Jones for Christian Dior and it is basically an organza suit. I wore it to the Brit awards in February [where Nile Rodgers & Chic were nominated for their first Brit award for international group] and it was as light as a feather.I called Kim over and over – I hounded him – and he kept saying: “It’s not even available yet: it’s only on the runway right now!” I was like: “I don’t care!” I had to have it. Continue reading…

  • Russia refuses to share data on blast that caused radiation spike
    by Andrew Roth in Moscow on August 20, 2019 at 1:22 pm

    Monitoring stations ceased transmitting data two days after the 8 August blastRussia has told international nuclear test ban monitors that it does not have to share information on the blast that caused a brief spike in radiation levels in Arkhangelsk region, bolstering speculation that Russia may have tampered with monitoring stations that failed to transmit scientific data after the accident.Two Russian-operated monitoring stations for the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty ceased transmitting data two days after the 8 August blast, when a projected radioactive plume from the deadly accident would be expected to reach them. Continue reading…

  • Robotic fish and an Ivorian laundry service: Tuesday’s top photos
    by Compiled by Joe Mee on August 20, 2019 at 1:19 pm

    The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world Continue reading…

  • Delhi ex-MPs told to vacate official bungalows or have utilities cut off
    by Amrit Dhillon in Delhi on August 20, 2019 at 1:18 pm

    About 200 grand bungalows in Lutyens zone are still occupied by former MPs They will not have their belongings thrown out on to the road – not yet – but Indian former MPs who lost their seats at the last election have been told that if they fail to vacate their official bungalows within a week, the gas, electricity and water will be cut off.About 200 grand bungalows in the heart of Delhi, part of an area built as the capital of the British Raj, are still occupied by ex-MPs who should have left the residences within a month of the last parliament being dissolved on 25 May. Continue reading…

  • Love Island’s Ovie Soko: ‘Young black people need to know they can be themselves’
    by Lanre Bakare on August 20, 2019 at 1:00 pm

    He was the breakout star of this summer’s series – an ally of women, with refreshingly goofy charm. But that doesn’t mean the 28-year-old’s mum has stopped checking up on himIn a corner office in ITV’s headquarters in central London, the former Love Island contestant Ovie Soko is about to be embarrassed by his mum, Foluso. The pair have recently been on This Morning, cooking Eamonn Holmes’s breakfast live on air, completing the promotional duties of any successful reality TV star. But now, as his dad, Ray, quietly eats a supermarket sandwich, the dirt is about to be dished.“He talks about himself in the third person,” says Foluso. Continue reading…

  • Detention of Muslims at UK ports and airports ‘structural Islamophobia’
    by Dan Sabbagh on August 20, 2019 at 1:00 pm

    Dossier by Cage attacks ‘suspicionless stops’ under anti-terror laws and highlights minuscule rate of convictionsMuslims are being detained at ports and airports for up to six hours by law enforcement using controversial counter-terrorism powers so disproportionately that the practice has become Islamophobic, according to human rights group Cage.The organisation added there is growing anecdotal evidence that Muslim women are being forced to remove their headscarves when stopped, even though the rate that such stops lead to a conviction is 0.007%, according to Cage’s analysis of 420,000 incidences. Continue reading…

  • Asylum seekers crammed into rat-infested rooms
    by Diane Taylor on August 20, 2019 at 12:32 pm

    ‘Guest houses’ provided by Home Office contractor unfit for habitation, say lawyersHundreds of asylum seekers have been crammed into a network of “guest houses” provided by a Home Office contractor that are overrun by cockroaches, rats and mice, the Guardian has learned.Lawyers shown footage recorded by the Guardian – which reveals that families of four are sharing small double beds and are being crammed into spaces so small that they are barely able to walk around their rooms – said that the conditions could constitute statutory overcrowding and an environment unfit for human habitation. Continue reading…

  • Being an EU citizen in the UK was hard enough. Now Priti Patel has made it worse | Marie Le Conte
    by Marie Le Conte on August 20, 2019 at 12:00 pm

    After three years of confusion, those of us who have chosen to make Britain our home are still none the wiser about our statusBeing an EU citizen living in the UK for the past three years has largely had the same rhythm as an undergraduate degree: relax, relax, panic for a week, enter a deep state of denial, relax, relax and repeat.We have either been forgotten about for months at a time, breezily told that everything will be fine (but we shouldn’t bother filling our pretty little heads with the fine print), or reminded that our main function resides with the services we provide to Britons. EU citizens are mostly great when we pick your fruit or treat your gran; we may choose other professions, but should have the decency to stay quiet if we do so. Continue reading…

  • Nigel Slater’s carrots, rice and crisp summer vegetables recipe
    by Nigel Slater on August 20, 2019 at 11:00 am

    A crunchy and succulent rice and veg treatPeel and roughly chop 400g of carrots. Bring 500ml of water to the boil, add the carrots and cook until the carrots are completely tender. Tip the carrots and their liquid into a blender, add 30g of butter and process to a thick cream. Continue reading…

  • PC Andrew Harper: accused denies role in ‘horrific murder’
    by PA Media on August 20, 2019 at 10:15 am

    Jed Foster remanded in custody until crown court hearing over death of police officerA man accused of murdering PC Andrew Harper while he was investigating a reported burglary has denied any involvement in his killing.Jed Foster, 20, was charged on Monday over the death of the 28-year-old Thames Valley police constable in the village of Sulhamstead, in Berkshire. Harper died from multiple injuries after being dragged under a vehicle on Thursday evening. Continue reading…

  • ‘I understand my wife’s lived experience better’: meet the men who have taken their wives’ surnames
    by Ammar Kalia on August 20, 2019 at 10:00 am

    An estimated 3% of men choose to turn gender stereotyping on its head when they get married. Why – and do any of them regret it?What’s in a name? While marriages between opposite-sex couples have been in gradual decline in the UK since the 1970s, with nearly 250,000 marriages in England and Wales in 2016, the vast majority of wives still take their husbands’ names. Although there are no statistics available for the UK, only 3% of men in the US changed to their wives’ surnames, a 2016 study found.For Nick Black, the decision to take his wife’s name was part of a wider refiguring of his family’s identity after he got married last year. “I was never that wedded to my former surname, Earley,” he says. “I’m part of a compound family, and have a sister by birth and two siblings by marriage, so we have always had different names. For me, family isn’t tied to a name. My wife, on the other hand, is from a very small family, and so it was more important to her to keep her name.” Continue reading…

  • Bone-shaking bass, costumes on wheels and the joy of jerk chicken: a guide to Notting Hill Carnival
    by Lanre Bakare, Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Maxine-Laurie Marshall on August 20, 2019 at 9:42 am

    Where’s the best spot to watch the floats? What’s the tastiest food? And which songs will be this year’s earworms? Our writers check out the word on the streetThis is the beating heart of Notting Hill Carnival (NHC) and it’s responsible for pumping a steady flow of colour, feathers and good vibes across W10 and W11 over the August bank holiday. The parade – set to the infectious sounds of soca – is arguably the star of the weekend. Continue reading…

  • Amazon under fire for new packaging that cannot be recycled
    by Miles Brignall on August 20, 2019 at 9:42 am

    Use of plastic envelopes branded a ‘major step backwards’ in fight against pollutionAmazon has been criticised by environmental groups and customers after introducing a range of plastic packaging that cannot be recycled in the UK.While supermarkets and other retailers have been reducing their use of single use plastics, the world’s biggest online retailer has started sending small items in plastic envelopes, seemingly to allow more parcels to be loaded on to each delivery truck. Continue reading…

  • ‘I don’t blame any teacher for not coming out as gay’
    by Iesha Small on August 20, 2019 at 6:15 am

    It took Iesha Small 10 years in schools before she felt she could be open about her sexuality. Here she explains whyI’d been a teacher for over 10 years before I felt comfortable enough to just be myself. I had settled into a rhythm. I wanted to be a great maths teacher – why did I have to face the burden of being a role model for LGBTQ students too?Some colleagues knew about my sexuality. If someone asked about my “husband”, I’d casually tell them the situation. And it was working OK. Then one day the stakes suddenly got bigger. Continue reading…

  • Life after apartheid: images from the new South Africa
    by All photographs: Thabiso Sekgala/courtesy of the artist and Goodman Gallery on August 20, 2019 at 6:00 am

    Thabiso Sekgala’s solo show features work taken by the late South African photographer offering nuanced, alternative narratives about life in contemporary Africa. His work focused on the idea of home and the personal, political or economic conditions that determine our relationship to it. Continue reading…

  • ‘Before I was kidnapped I had friends’: the girl soldiers of South Sudan | Samuel Okiror
    by Samuel Okiror in Yambio county on August 20, 2019 at 6:00 am

    A reintegration programme has helped 360 girls leave armed groups in Yambio county but for many the trauma of sexual violence persistsLate one night in April 2015, 13-year-old Patricia* and her sister, who was 11, were kidnapped from their beds by rebel forces fighting the government in South Sudan.The girls were taken from their home in a raid on their village by the South Sudan National Liberation Movement in Yambio county, not far from the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Continue reading…

  • I lose my erection during sex with my wife – am I overthinking it?
    by Pamela Stephenson Connolly on August 20, 2019 at 6:00 am

    At the beginning of our relationship, she would orgasm about five times to my one. I sometimes feel as if I am not letting myself goDuring intercourse, my wife and I will be going well and I will lose my erection. I am aroused and I love her, but I get inside my head and think too hard. At the beginning of our relationship, she would orgasm about five times to my one; it was always that I took too long. I sometimes feel as if I am not letting myself go. Is it a confidence thing?Sex is not a competition. There is no scoreboard. If you approach love-making as though there is a goal to achieve – or even with the main intention of being good at it – you will fail to enjoy it fully. During lovemaking, try to make your principal aim simply giving and receiving pleasure. Approach sex in the knowledge that it is common and normative to lose your erection from time to time – and that erectile failure is more likely to happen if you are nervous and goal-oriented. Instead of trying to even the score, simply allow yourself to receive pleasure as well as give it. You are married to someone you love and she seems to be sexually fulfilled; all you have to do is to relax and enjoy being with her … without counting climaxes. Continue reading…

  • ‘He cried and I cried’: the highs and lows of exam results day for teachers
    by Donna Ferguson on August 20, 2019 at 5:59 am

    Opening GCSE and A-level results can mean tears or elation for students – but also for their teachers Continue reading…

  • The cult of Columbine: how an obsession with school shooters led to a murder plot
    by Rachel Monroe on August 20, 2019 at 5:00 am

    How two lonely outsiders met online and discovered their passion – planning a massacre at a shopping mall. By Rachel MonroeIt was an extremely online romance, as many were in 2014: they followed each other on Tumblr, then they became Facebook friends, then they started chatting. James Gamble was 19, aimless and unemployed. Lindsay Souvannarath was 22, with a newly minted degree from a small liberal arts school in Iowa and vague plans to join the Peace Corps.Over the next seven weeks, Lindsay and James would come to feel that their meeting was part of some great cosmic plan. They were in similar places in their lives: young adults still living with their parents, socially awkward, virgins. They did not spend much time talking about the mundane building blocks of adulthood – school, family, work – in part because those parts of life had felt hostile to both of them for a long time. Instead, they discussed the other things they had in common – how they both walked stiffly and too fast; how as soon as they entered a room, other people could sense that something about them did not quite fit. How they could tell that strangers were afraid of them. How they had grown to like it, in a way, the perverse kind of power that came from being the kind of person everyone else wanted to stay away from. Continue reading…

  • From Sun to Sun: the photo series livening up New York City bus shelters
    by Nadja Sayej on August 20, 2019 at 5:00 am

    Elle Pérez has used 100 bus stops in the city to showcase their experience growing up as a non-binary Puerto Rican New YorkerThe punk community in the Bronx has a secret handshake called the Flight. It involves a fist bump, a finger point and a chest pat. Most of us will never understand it, but we will see it.A photograph of the handshake is now on view in various bus stops across all five boroughs of New York City until 24 November. It’s part of a new series of images by the Bronx-born artist Elle Pérez called From Sun to Sun, which puts 16 photos on more than 100 bus stops in 13 neighborhoods in the city, from Harlem to Williamsburg. Continue reading…

  • Death, blackouts, melting asphalt: ways the climate crisis will change how we live
    by Pam Radtke Russell in New Orleans on August 20, 2019 at 5:00 am

    From power cuts to infrastructure failure, the impact of climate change on US cities will be huge – but many are already innovating to adaptBetween record heat and rain, this summer’s weather patterns have indicated, once again, that the climate is changing.US cities, where more than 80% of the nation’s population lives, are disproportionately hit by these changes, not only because of their huge populations but because of their existing – often inadequate – infrastructure. Continue reading…

  • ‘It’s a sign of panic’: EU nationals on the UK’s threat to end free movement
    by Mattha Busby and Amelia Gentleman on August 19, 2019 at 6:27 pm

    Three UK residents yet to apply for settled status describe their fears about a no-deal Brexit‘Reckless’ plan to cut off free movement alarms EU nationalsEU citizens living, working and studying in the UK have spoken of their fears for the future after the Home Office announced plans to end freedom of movement immediately after a no-deal Brexit.Silvia González, 40, who moved to Wales from Spain in May 2015 after falling in love with British culture during a year studying in the country when she was younger, said Brexit had turned her “dream into a nightmare”. Continue reading…

  • Owen Jones​ on his​ attack: ‘I get headlines​. Many minorities don’t’ – video
    by Owen Jones, Maeve Shearlaw and James Turner on August 19, 2019 at 4:58 pm

    The Guardian columnist was attacked outside a pub in London over the weekend. Here he talks about what happened and why he believes we can’t be complacent about the far-right threat Owen Jones: attackers targeted me for my politicsContinue reading…

  • ‘Go here if you want depression!’: the bleak, funny world of Google school reviews
    by Amelia Tait on August 19, 2019 at 2:59 pm

    Pupils and parents use the search engine’s ratings to complain about teachers, food and fellow students – and sometimes apparently to make digs at rival schoolsIt all started because Willow was going back to school. The 17-year-old American was complaining about the new school year, when a friend struck upon an idea. Why not check Google for reviews of their schools? “Go here if you want depression!” read the first one-star review they stumbled upon.Willow immediately tweeted her findings, encouraging others to look up their own schools and share theirs. The replies came thick and fast. One reviewer’s school is “completely trash”, another has “terrible and inedible” food. One four-star review simply notes: “The kids are really odd here.” Continue reading…

  • Tips, links and suggestions: what are you reading this week?
    by Guardian readers and Sam Jordison on August 19, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    Your space to discuss the books you are reading and what you think of them Are you on Instagram? Then you can be featured here by tagging your books-related posts with #GuardianBooksScroll down for our favourite literary linksRead more Tips, links and suggestions blogsWelcome to this week’s blogpost. Here’s our roundup of your comments and photos from last week.Let’s begin with a tribute to Ronald Blythe’s Akenfield by PatLux: Continue reading…

  • ‘The monster to slay before domestic policies is Brexit’: readers on Corbyn’s speech
    by Guardian readers and Rachel Obordo on August 19, 2019 at 11:33 am

    You have been reacting in the comments to Jeremy Corbyn’s speech on Labour’s vision to rebuild BritainLatest political developments – liveYes Jeremy, I agree. You are absolutely right. The problems of the UK run far deeper than Brexit. The thing is, the country did vote for Brexit. Millions of people who will suffer the consequences of Brexit voted for it. People whose prospects are so poor that they voted for Brexit on the assumption that things can’t get any worse. But he also has to acknowledge the fact that we cannot go on to do that with the threat of Brexit hanging above our heads. It will make everything so much worse, and take away our ability to address the issues that are causing so much misery and poverty. Brexit will not lead to any short term or mid term increase in job or wealth creation. It will have the opposite effect for most ordinary people. Continue reading…

  • Balenciaga: ‘the master’ of couture’s sculptural garments – in pictures
    on August 19, 2019 at 7:01 am

    The work of Cristóbal Balenciaga, one of the 20th century’s most revered fashion designers, is on display at Bendigo Art Gallery. The Shaping Fashion exhibition, curated by London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, explores the legacy of the Spanish couturier and his pioneering use of fabrics which revolutionised the silhouette. The exhibition features more than 100 garments and hats by the designer and sit alongside archival sketches, patterns, photographs, fabric samples and catwalk footage. Balenciaga’s pieces – characterised by their sculptural quality, deft manipulation of textiles and dramatic use of colour and texture – were revered by his contemporaries, including Christian Dior and Coco Chanel, and continue to inspire fashion designers today. • Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion is on at the Bendigo Art Gallery until 10 November 2019 Continue reading…

  • String theory: how to make an acoustic guitar – in pictures
    by All photographs by Christopher Thomond on August 19, 2019 at 6:01 am

    Rosie Heydenrych, an artisan luthier, has been making acoustic guitars by hand for about a decade. She shows Christopher Thomond around her workshop in Newchapel, Surrey, and explains the guitar-making process Continue reading…

  • Brazil to open long-distance hiking trail in Atlantic forest – in pictures
    by Ian Cheibub/AFP/Getty Images on August 19, 2019 at 6:00 am

    Inspired by long-distance tracks such as Canada’s 15,000-mile Great Trail, a proposed 4,970-mile trans-Brazil hiking trail would provide a continuous coastal corridor from its southern border with Uruguay to its northern frontier with French Guiana Continue reading…

  • Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of ‘appetite’
    by Guardian readers on August 18, 2019 at 8:00 am

    Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘appetite’The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘appetite’.Share your photos of what appetite means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box. Continue reading…

  • Antique firearms: gangs, guns and untraceable ‘ghost bullets’ – podcast
    by Presented by India Rakusen with Kenneth Rosen and Katharine Viner; produced by Dominic Byrne, Gary Marshall, Axel Kacoutié and Eloise Stevens; executive producers Nicole Jackson and Phil Maynard on August 16, 2019 at 2:00 am

    Kenneth Rosen on how British gangs are using a loophole in the law to get hold of antique firearms and untraceable bullets. Plus: Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner on the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo massacreA drive-by shooting of four girls outside a nightclub in Birmingham in 2003 shocked the country. Letisha Shakespeare, aged 17, and Charlene Ellis, aged 18, both died, innocent victims caught in the crossfire of gang shootings. It set off a huge murder investigation, and when police examined the scene they found that one of the guns used was an antique and the ammunition was untraceable. Journalist Kenneth Rosen tells India Rakusen how those bullets found at the scene in 2003 were the beginning of a mystery. Hundreds of ‘ghost bullets’ started to appear in crime scenes across the country and a long search began for their creator. Continue reading…

  • Tell us: how have you reused your wedding dress?
    by Guardian readers on August 15, 2019 at 4:04 pm

    We want to hear if you opted for a non-traditional dress, or if you’ve repurposed it so you could wear it againWorn for the big day, gone tomorrow – for many people a wedding dress will be the single most expensive item of clothing they ever buy. It may also be the item of clothing they wear the least.With sustainability taking centre stage, something about the practice of spending big on a labour-intensive dress that is worn only once doesn’t quite stack up, which is perhaps why many women are choosing to do things a little differently. Continue reading…

  • Phillip Hammond, the Treasury and the risk of a no-deal Brexit – podcast
    by Presented by Anushka Asthana with Poppy Trowbridge and Carey Gillam; produced by Joshua Kelly, Gary Marshall and Eloise Stevens; executive producers Phil Maynard and Nicole Jackson on August 15, 2019 at 2:00 am

    Poppy Trowbridge on her work as a special adviser in Hammond’s Treasury as it tried to plan for Brexit and avoid crashing out with no deal. Plus, Carey Gillam on how the biotech company Monsanto tried to destroy her reputationParliament is gearing up for an autumn showdown over the possibility of a no-deal Brexit. Philip Hammond, until recently the chancellor of the exchequer, has accused Boris Johnson of shutting down any hope of securing an agreement. But the prime minister’s team continues to argue that Britain must leave the EU by 31 October. It has been quite a journey for the Treasury: from accusations of “project fear” when it warned against any Brexit at all under George Osborne in 2016, to Hammond’s hopes of minimising the damage with an orderly withdrawal, and now, under Sajid Javid, preparing for the economic impact of no deal. Continue reading…

  • Why Jordan Peterson is filling the void | Modern Masculinity: episode 1
    by Iman Amrani Noah Payne-Frank Bruno Rinvolucri Grace Shutti Ryan Baxter Paul Boyd on August 14, 2019 at 10:58 am

    Is modern masculinity in crisis? As part of a new series for the Guardian, journalist Iman Amrani is speaking to men across the UK about the issues affecting men and boys in today’s society. In this episode, Iman asks, away from the polemic headlines, what is it about Jordan Peterson that has made him such a popular and influential voice for so many men?Men need meaning and responsibility | Modern Masculinity: episode 2Continue reading…

  • How to perfect a day-to-night wardrobe (minus the fuss)
    by Katherine Ormerod on August 14, 2019 at 8:51 am

    While being spontaneous is a fun way to live your life, such ‘happy surprises’ can play havoc with your fashion game. But fear not, Katherine Ormerod is here to ensure your style is as on point as your attitudeThe notion of boardroom-to-bar chic, used to describe the one outfit for a woman that segues seamlessly between professional and social settings, appears straightforward. We’ve certainly been talking about it for long enough – ever since women joined the labour force en masse in the 1960s and 1970s, the fashion industry has been pushing the holy grail of sartorial flexibility. Take Diane von Furstenberg’s iconic wrap dress: elegant enough for a business meeting, yet still feminine enough to work for a date after hours. Indeed, we’ve been musing over it so long, you might presume it’s something you couldn’t get wrong. Strange then, that even after a career of 15 years in clothes as an editor on various style magazines, I’ve often made mistakes. Continue reading…

  • Helping a nine-year-old recover from an eating disorder – podcast
    by Presented by Anushka Asthana with Gwyn Topham produced by India Rakusen, Gary Marshall and Eloise Stevens; executive producers Nicole Jackson and Phil Maynard on August 14, 2019 at 2:00 am

    We hear about the importance of early intervention in rare cases of pre-teen eating disorders. Plus, calls to ban hands-free phone use while drivingMaggie and her husband James have four daughters. While their oldest, Hattie, was still at primary school, she began severely restricting the amount she ate and exercising obsessively. Eating disorders in young people can be life-threatening, although this wasn’t the case for Hattie. Her case was unusual because of the age at which her problems began – she was nine. Continue reading…

  • ‘They just eliminate us’: Are Kenya’s police getting away with murder? – video
    by Kyri Evangelou , Rod Austin, Katie Lamborn, Tracy McVeigh, Marina Costa, Ben Kape and Ken Macfarlane on August 6, 2019 at 5:00 am

    Promising student Carilton Maina was shot by the police in Nairobi. His mother believes he was murdered. As part of The Guardian’s special focus on Kibera, we met residents of Africa’s largest slum to explore their deep distrust of the police and find out what Maina’s, and other recent deaths, can tell us about the dramatic rise in extrajudicial killings across Kenya. Continue reading…

  • One man’s fight to get knives off the streets of London – video
    by Kyri Evangelou, Maeve Shearlaw and Katie Lamborn on August 2, 2019 at 10:58 am

    Shocked by a series of stabbings in his area of east London, Courtney Barrett set up his own knife amnesty in an effort to get blades off the streets. As he collects 25 knives from members of the public outside Leytonstone tube station, he explains why he is volunteering to do something that is traditionally the job of the police Continue reading…

  • How a conference call sparked America’s abortion obsession – video explainer
    by Leah Green Shay Notelovitz Joseph Pierce Ben Kape Ryan Baxter Paul Boyd on August 1, 2019 at 10:13 am

    White evangelical Christians are on the frontline of the US’s anti-abortion movement. But not so long ago this group was not interested in the politics of terminations. Its members are a crucial faction of Donald Trump’s base, motivating him to further restrict abortion rights. How did it all change? Leah Green investigates how a group of men turned abortion into a tool that shaped the course of American politics Continue reading…

  • ‘You don’t have to look black to be black’: The complex racial identity of a tiny Ohio town – video
    by Tom Silverstone and Francisco Navas on July 25, 2019 at 4:42 pm

    In the remote Ohio town of East Jackson, which sits in the Appalachian foothills, residents have for decades identified as black – despite the fact they appear white. Tom Silverstone and Francisco Navas visit a place where residents’ racial lines have been blurred to invisibility Continue reading…

  • Richard Ratcliffe’s determined fight to free wife Nazanin from an Iranian jail – video
    by Kyri Evangelou Maeve Shearlaw Charlie Phillips Marina Costa on July 18, 2019 at 2:48 pm

    In 2016 Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was arrested in Iran and charged with espionage. Her young daughter, Gabriella, was with her at the time and the family have been separated ever since. We join her husband, Richard Ratcliffe, in London following a 15-day hunger strike as he campaigns to get his wife released. He shares his experience in detail and explains how Boris Johnson could have hindered her chances of coming home Continue reading…

  • It’s time we stopped treating soil like dirt – video
    by Josh Toussaint-Strauss Ryan Baxter Joseph Pierce Ken Macfarlane Ben Kape Paul Boyd on July 11, 2019 at 11:12 am

    Soil is pretty remarkable stuff. It provides 95% of our food, helps regulate the Earth’s atmosphere and is a bigger carbon sink than all the world’s forests combined. In fact, it basically enables all life on this planet to exist. So why do we treat it like dirt? The Guardian journalist Josh Toussaint-Strauss finds out how we are destroying it, but also discovers some of the progress made in the race to protect the Earth’s soils’It’s a groundswell’: the farmers fighting to save the Earth’s soilSoil organisationsCampaign to protect rural England Sustainable Soils AllianceSoil AssociationContinue reading…

  • ‘He feels like any other nine-year-old’: how technology helped open up the world to my son
    by Eimear O’Hagan on July 3, 2019 at 3:26 pm

    Nikki Hunter-Pike explains how accessibility technology has opened up the online world to her son, who has cerebral palsyIt’s Saturday morning at Nikki Hunter-Pike’s home. While she prepares breakfast, and her husband Daniel plays with their daughters Brooke and Harper, her son Chase is engrossed in sending an email to his beloved stepgrandfather, “Pops”, his face a study in intense concentration.Nine-year-old Chase, who has the neurological condition cerebral palsy, cannot walk, talk, feed himself or pick up a pen. Yet, thanks to technology that’s widely available, he can communicate, learn and explore the online world from his family’s home in Northfleet, Kent. Continue reading…

  • Creature comforts: has the US’s emotional support animal epidemic gone too far? – video
    by Richard Sprenger, Alex Healey, Jem Talbot, Ken Macfarlane and Katie Lamborn on June 26, 2019 at 8:30 am

    Emotional support animals, or ESAs, have exploded across the US in recent years, with rising numbers of pet owners getting their animals certified online. Unlike in the UK, ESAs have legal status in the US on a tier below traditional service animals, but the backlash has begun – with critics complaining the system is being abused by regular pet owners who want to take their animals into unsuitable public spaces. The Guardian’s Richard Sprenger – animal lover but pet sceptic – meets ESA owners and their animals across North America. Continue reading…

  • Pay it forward: Vesta is the socially minded restaurant feeding its customers and Edinburgh’s homeless
    by Cath Renton on June 24, 2019 at 11:42 am

    Nestled in the centre of Edinburgh’s well-heeled district is a social enterprise that has attracted the love of locals, and even Hollywood starsThe restaurants that line the cobbled Georgian streets of Edinburgh’s West End project an air of exclusivity and expense. But amid the boutique hotels and cocktail bars, just a few feet from Princes Street and in the shadow of Edinburgh Castle, you’ll find a restaurant with an inclusive atmosphere that delivers feelgood food while supporting a charitable cause.Owner David Hall took charge of Vesta, formerly known as Home, in July 2018 and the restaurant partners with Social Bite – a charity that seeks to end homelessness in Scotland. Named after the Roman goddess of hearth, home, and family, the restaurant is committed to supplying free meals and training opportunities to homeless and vulnerable people in Edinburgh. Customers can donate the price of a coffee or a meal through a “pay it forward” scheme, which funds the restaurant to host 40 homeless diners every week. Continue reading…

  • How your period is making other people rich – video
    by Leah Green, Shay Notelovitz, Simon Roberts, Joseph Pierce, Ben Kape and Paul Boyd on June 20, 2019 at 10:30 am

    Menstrual cycles have historically been a personal topic. But with the rise of period-tracking apps, intimate knowledge of women’s bodies has become big business, with marketers using the data women and girls put into their phones to exploit their hormones in an attempt to sell them things they did not realise they wanted Continue reading…

  • London’s toxic school runs: how polluted is the air children breathe? – video
    by Nick Van Mead Anetta Jones Christopher Cherry Simon Roberts Jess Gormley Chris Michael on June 19, 2019 at 5:17 pm

    Most UK cities have had illegally polluted air for nearly a decade, and the effect of air pollution is particularly bad on children. Ahead of Clean Air Day, we conducted an experiment to assess the air quality on a school run in central London, using new state-of-the art monitors that can measure air pollution in real time Continue reading…

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