Opinion Drama

  • George Floyd protests: civil rights groups sue Trump and Barr for use of teargas outside White House – live
    by Maanvi Singh (now), and Martin Pengelly,Joan E Greve, Joanna Walters and Martin Belam (earlier) on June 4, 2020 at 11:43 pm

    President and attorney general sued over assault on peaceful protestersFloyd family’s lawyer, Benjamin Crump says ‘pandemic of racism and discrimination killed George Floyd’Barr claims evidence ‘antifa’ instigating violenceIs it safe to protest during a pandemic?US police have a history of violence against black people. Will it stop?Sign up to our First Thing newsletter 12.43am BSTHallie Golden reports from Washington state, on a case with disturbing echoes of the killing of George Floyd:The death of an African American father of two who called out “I can’t breathe” while handcuffed in police custody in March in Washington state has been ruled a homicide, according to a medical examiner’s report released on Wednesday.Manuel Ellis, 33, died of respiratory arrest on 3 March in Tacoma, about 35 miles south of Seattle, due to hypoxia and physical restraint, said Rich O’Brien, an investigator for the Pierce county medical examiner’s office. Other factors that may have contributed to his death included methamphetamine intoxication and heart disease. Related: ‘I can’t breathe’: death of black man in custody ruled a homicide in Washington 12.33am BSTIt’s worth pointing out here that Cotton’s op-ed in the Times contained several false and unvalidated claims including the notion that “leftwing radicals, like Antifa, infiltrated marches.” Times journalists have debunked the Antifa claim. The New York NewsGuild called the choice to publish Cotton’s piece “an irresponsible choice”, noting that “invoking state violence disproportionately hurts Black and brown people. It also jeopardizes our journalists’ ability to work in the field safely and effectively.” Continue reading…

  • Death of man after face mask arrest shines light on Mexican police brutality
    by David Agren in Mexico City on June 4, 2020 at 11:31 pm

    Video shows officers forcing man into a police truck as bystanders plead for his releaseMexicans have responded with outrage after a man was found beaten to death hours after he was arrested by police officers for not wearing a face mask in public.Giovanni López, a 30-year-old bricklayer, was detained on 4 May by municipal police officers in the town of Ixtlahuacán de Los Membrillos near Guadalajara. Continue reading…

  • Turkey announces weekend lockdown in 15 cities – as it happened
    by Helen Sullivan (now and earlier) ; Nadeem Badshah , Lucy Campbell ,Simon Burnton , and Rebecca Ratcliffe on June 4, 2020 at 11:24 pm

    UK pledges £1.65bn to public-private vaccine partnership; €130bn German package cuts VAT, offers cash grants; New Zealand marks 13 days without new Covid-19 case. This blog is closedFollow the latest global coronavirus live blog here 12.22am BSTWe’ve fired up a brand new global coronavirus blog at the link below – head there for the latest: Related: Coronavirus live news: South Africa sees record jump in cases as New York protestors urged to get tested 12.01am BSTThe antiviral drug remdesivir has been recommended for the treatment of Covid-19 patients in Australia, by the national taskforce bringing together the country’s peak health groups, AAP reports. The National Covid-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce said Australian doctors treating adults with moderate, severe or critical Covid-19 should consider using the drug to aid recovery times. Related: Remdesivir: Ebola drug endorsed as a coronavirus treatment in Australia Continue reading…

  • Coronavirus latest: at a glance
    by Nadeem Badshah on June 4, 2020 at 11:12 pm

    A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreakFollow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updatesKey developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include:  Continue reading…

  • Trump orders agencies cut environment reviews, citing ‘economic emergency’
    by Emily Holden in Washington on June 4, 2020 at 11:08 pm

    Changes could hurt communities of color, which are more likely to live with pollution due to decades of environmental racismThe Trump administration continued to weaken core environmental protections in the US by announcing a pair of policies to cut reviews for large infrastructure projects and downplay the health benefits of rules to curb pollution.Both changes could disproportionately hurt communities of color, which are far more likely to live with pollution because of decades of environmental racism. They come after a week of nationwide protests over police killings of black Americans.  Continue reading…

  • Cardiac patients ‘at risk because of cancelled procedures’ in England
    by Denis Campbell Health policy editor on June 4, 2020 at 11:01 pm

    British Heart Foundation says NHS focus on Covid-19 has left tens of thousands vulnerableCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageTens of thousands of people with heart problems are at risk because they have not had potentially life-saving surgery during the coronavirus pandemic, a leading charity has said.At least 28,000 patients in England have missed out on cardiac surgery since March, when hospitals suspended many normal services to focus on Covid-19, the British Heart Foundation (BHF) says. Continue reading…

  • Covid-19 causing 10,000 dementia deaths beyond infections, research says
    by Hannah Devlin Science correspondent on June 4, 2020 at 11:01 pm

    Charities warn that with reduced medical care and family visits sufferers are ‘just switching off’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThere were almost 10,000 unexplained extra deaths among people with dementia in April, according to official figures that have prompted alarm about the severe impact of social isolation on people with the condition.The data, from the Office for National Statistics, reveals that, beyond deaths directly linked to Covid-19, there were 83% more deaths from dementia than usual in April, with charities warning that a reduction in essential medical care and family visits were taking a devastating toll. Continue reading…

  • Live music returns to Royal Opera House for an online audience
    by Imogen Tilden on June 4, 2020 at 11:01 pm

    Collaboration with BBC will see three concerts live-streamed from the Covent Garden stage; Abbey Road reopens and welcomes back recording musicians; and BBC announces its first remote access documentary featuring the Kanneh-Mason family in lockdownThe Royal Opera House is to host its first live event since closing its doors to the public on 17 March. On Saturday 13 June the first concert in a series of three will be live-streamed from the famous London stage via YouTube and Facebook and broadcast on Radio 3. The programme will include performances from singers Louise Alder, Toby Spence and Gerald Finley, and a world premiere of a new work by choreographer Wayne McGregor.Two further concerts (on 20 and 27 June) will be available to view live and on demand for £4.99, but the opening concert will be free, and will be hosted by the BBC’s Anita Rani and the ROH’s director of music, Antonio Pappano. BBC Television will subsequently broadcast highlights from all three concerts, and have also today announced a rebroadcast of Pappano’s acclaimed 2010 series Opera Italia. Continue reading…

  • UK equality watchdog to launch inquiry into entrenched racism
    by Alexandra Topping on June 4, 2020 at 11:01 pm

    EHRC says analysis and evidence-based guidance needed to tackle areas such as Covid-19 death rates in minority groupsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe UK’s equality watchdog is launching an inquiry into “long-standing, structural race inequality”, which has been thrown into stark relief by the coronavirus pandemic.The Equality and Human Rights Commission said it would carry out in-depth analysis and develop evidence-based recommendations for urgent action to tackle entrenched racial inequalities in specific areas. Continue reading…

  • Remdesivir: Ebola drug endorsed as a coronavirus treatment in Australia
    by Australian Associated Press on June 4, 2020 at 10:10 pm

    Taskforce says doctors treating adults with moderate, severe or critical Covid-19 should consider using drug to aid recovery timesThe antiviral drug remdesivir has been recommended for the treatment of Covid-19 patients in Australia, by the national taskforce bringing together the country’s peak health groups.The National Covid-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce said Australian doctors treating adults with moderate, severe or critical Covid-19 should consider using the drug to aid recovery times. Continue reading…

  • ‘Can’t quite believe it’: New Zealand tiptoes towards elimination of coronavirus
    by Charlotte Graham-McLay in Wellington on June 4, 2020 at 10:05 pm

    With an anonymous woman in Auckland the last confirmed case, scientists expect to be able to declare next week that the nation is virus-freeCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAs health officials announce each new day of no new Covid-19 cases, social media explodes with New Zealanders celebrating the news.“That feeling like you got away with something that seemed impossible and you can’t quite believe it even though you want to believe it,” wrote one, on Twitter. “But for an entire country.” Continue reading…

  • Geoffrey Boycott could end TMS career after BBC omit 79-year-old from lineup
    by Ali Martin on June 4, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    Former England opener left off list of BBC commentators Isa Guha to present BBC Two highlights show with Alastair CookGeoffrey Boycott appears to have commentated on his last match for BBC Test Match Special after the corporation announced its lineup of on-air talent for the summer and omitted the former England batsman. Related: Three West Indies players decline to travel for England Test series Continue reading…

  • Thousands of UK tenants face losing home when eviction ban ends
    by Patrick Butler Social policy editor on June 4, 2020 at 9:30 pm

    Campaigners warn that people who have not paid rent during lockdown have received landlord warning noticesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThousands of tenants who have struggled to pay rent during the pandemic lockdown face the prospect of losing their home from the end of the month when the government’s temporary ban on evictions ends, housing campaigners have warned.Without an extension to the government’s moratorium on evictions, which runs out on 25 June, many landlords could start or continue repossession proceedings against tenants unable to meet rents over the past few weeks, they said. Continue reading…

  • Bank of England faces calls to overhaul ‘restrictive’ remit
    by Phillip Inman on June 4, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    Move will accelerate recovery from coronavirus crisis, says Policy Exchange thinktankCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe government should cut taxes and overhaul the Bank of England’s “restrictive” remit as part of a radical new pro-growth strategy to accelerate the recovery from the coronavirus crisis, according to a free market thinktank with close ties to the Conservative party.Policy Exchange, which was co-founded by Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove, warned ministers to take a relaxed view of rising levels of debt and use cheap credit to boost the economy and protect jobs. Continue reading…

  • Wage reductions and summer matches loom for England’s top players
    by Robert Kitson on June 4, 2020 at 9:00 pm

    International wipeout would have ‘catastrophic impact’Six Nations could be moved; autumn tours abandonedEngland’s leading players face the increasing prospect of wage cuts and summer rugby as the sport battles to avoid financial meltdown because of the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.The Rugby Football Union also confirmed it is open to shifting the Six Nations championship from its traditional slot in the calendar and remains hopeful of crowds being able to attend England games this autumn. Continue reading…

  • Race relations charity criticised over attacks on Prevent and MP
    by Helen Pidd North of England editor on June 4, 2020 at 8:56 pm

    Watchdog condemns Just West Yorkshire reports on anti-extremism programme and Sarah ChampionA race relations charity has been reprimanded for paying a former trustee thousands of pounds to write a dubiously sourced report calling the government’s anti-extremism programme Islamophobic, and releasing a press statement accusing a Labour MP of stoking racist abuse against the Pakistani community.In 2018, Just West Yorkshire published a critical report about the Rotherham MP Sarah Champion after she wrote an article in the Sun headlined: “British Pakistani men ARE raping and exploiting white girls – it’s time we faced up to it.” Continue reading…

  • Doctor quits NHS over Dominic Cummings’ refusal to resign
    by Denis Campbell Health policy editor on June 4, 2020 at 8:54 pm

    Exclusive: Dr Dominic Pimenta says behaviour of PM’s adviser could help trigger second wave of Covid-19Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA doctor is quitting the NHS in protest at Dominic Cummings’ refusal to resign despite allegedly flouting lockdown rules.Dr Dominic Pimenta has decided to resign because he fears that the behaviour of Boris Johnson’s chief adviser could help trigger a second wave of coronavirus and is angered by the government’s handling of the pandemic. Continue reading…

  • The Sweet bassist Steve Priest dies aged 72
    by Laura Snapes on June 4, 2020 at 8:48 pm

    Family did not share a cause of death for the glam rock star, who had 13 Top 20 hits in the 1970sSteve Priest, bassist and vocalist with glam rock band The Sweet, has died age 72. His bandmates confirmed the news, sharing a statement from the family. The cause of death is not yet known.Bandmate Andy Scott paid tribute to Priest, describing him as the best bass player he had ever played with. “From that moment in the summer of 1970 when we set off on our musical odyssey the world opened up and the roller coaster ride started.” Continue reading…

  • German prisoner is ‘strongest Madeleine McCann suspect yet’
    by Vikram Dodd, Ben Quinn and Kate Connolly on June 4, 2020 at 8:38 pm

    Police in UK, Portugal and Germany launch joint appeal for information about Christian BrücknerDetectives in three countries have appealed for evidence in relation to the strongest suspect they have had in 13 years to the disappearance of Madeleine McCann, as German authorities said they believe she is dead.Circumstantial evidence has convinced detectives that a 43-year-old German child sex offender and rapist, identified by Portuguese sources on Thursday as Christian Brückner, is their prime suspect as it emerged he has been known to police for years. Continue reading…

  • AstraZeneca doubles capacity for potential Covid-19 vaccine to 2bn doses
    by Kalyeena Makortoff on June 4, 2020 at 8:13 pm

    Company will increase manufacturing capability after striking additional deal worth £595mCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAstraZeneca has doubled the manufacturing capacity for its potential Covid-19 vaccine to 2bn doses after striking a number of deals that include two health organisations backed by Bill and Melinda Gates.Last month the pharmaceutical giant said it could manufacture 1bn doses of the vaccine that it is developing in partnership with with researchers at Oxford University. Continue reading…

  • Alok Sharma receives negative coronavirus test result
    by Rajeev Syal on June 4, 2020 at 8:11 pm

    Opposition say fears sparked by symptoms show MPs should stay away from parliamentCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAlok Sharma, the business secretary who showed symptoms of coronavirus, has received a negative test result amid opposition warnings that the scare showed how easily Downing Street and Westminster could be thrown by a fresh outbreak.Sharma was tested after feeling unwell on Wednesday while delivering a statement in the House of Commons. It emerged that over the previous 24 hours he had attended a meeting with Boris Johnson and the chancellor, Rishi Sunak, and stood close to other MPs as he queued to vote in the Commons. Continue reading…

  • The way is clear for Premier League’s Project Hope For The Best to begin
    by Barney Ronay on June 4, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    Project Restart has resisted all attempts at sabotage and for better or worse the great national distraction is coming backBeyond the meetings there are other meetings. And beyond those meetings, well, we might just be getting towards a decisive exit from that place between heaven and hell in which Premier League football has lurked for the past three months. Related: Premier League plan fixture list with Everton-Liverpool set for first Sunday Continue reading…

  • Fall guy Shapps takes turn to promote UK as ‘world beater’ in stupidity | John Crace
    by John Crace on June 4, 2020 at 7:57 pm

    Even our transport secretary is now running on fumes, unveiling face mask measures others made law a month agoA few days ago, the prime minister announced that he was doing away with the daily coronavirus briefings at weekends. It was just getting too hard to find cabinet ministers who were prepared to give up their Saturdays and Sundays – even the ever loyal “cut out and keep” Tory boy pastiche, Robert Jenrick, was playing hard to get – and Boris Johnson sure as hell couldn’t be bothered to do it himself.It can’t be long before No 10 pursues its dream of reducing the number still further, if Thursday’s showing is anything to go by. One – two at a push – a week would be just about ideal. A win-win situation that would cut the workload and save the daily embarrassment of a minister having to explain that the government really didn’t have much of a clue what it was doing and was just making up policy on the hoof. Continue reading…

  • NBA owners approve 22-team format to restart season in Florida by 29-1 vote
    by Guardian sport and agencies on June 4, 2020 at 7:46 pm

    Owners decide to resume season in Orlando by 29-1 voteApproval by players’ union is widely viewed as formality The National Basketball Association is set to become the first major North American sports league to resume play after the league’s board of governors approved a 22-team format for restarting the season in late July at the Disney campus near Orlando, Florida.ESPN reported the vote was 29-1 in favor of the proposal with only the Portland Trail Blazers dissenting. Continue reading…

  • Black and minority Americans more likely to get Covid-19, House panel hears
    by Jessica Glenza on June 4, 2020 at 7:11 pm

    Structural racism has left black and minority populations with inferior health, housing and economic conditions, witnesses saidCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBlack and minority Americans are more likely to be infected and die from Covid-19, because structural racism has left those populations with inferior health, housing and economic conditions, witnesses told a House subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis on Capitol Hill on Thursday. Even as protests against police violence roil the nation, the Covid-19 pandemic continues to infect or kill minority Americans at devastating rates – at least one independent report found black Americans dying at three times the rate of white Americans.  Continue reading…

  • Ukrainian prosecutors find no evidence against Hunter Biden
    by Reuters in Kyiv on June 4, 2020 at 7:07 pm

    Audit probed energy company Burisma, of which Biden was a board member from 2014-2019An audit of thousands of old case files by Ukrainian prosecutors found no evidence of wrongdoing on the part of Hunter Biden, the former prosecutor general, who had launched the audit, told Reuters.Ruslan Ryaboshapka was in the spotlight last year as the man who would decide whether to launch an investigation into former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter, in what became a key issue in the impeachment of President Donald Trump. Continue reading…

  • Steve Bell on the MPs queueing to vote in the Commons – cartoon
    by Steve Bell on June 4, 2020 at 7:05 pm

    Continue reading…

  • 10-week wait on glasses for 12,000 Boots customers
    by Sarah Butler on June 4, 2020 at 6:50 pm

    Thousands faced extensive wait for eyewear after retailer shut 549 opticians outlets due to lockdownBoots has forced nearly 12,000 glasses wearers to wait more than 10 weeks for eyewear after the company closed the vast majority of its opticians outlets.The retailer has continued to operate its high street pharmacies and stores throughout the coronavirus outbreak but shut all but 51 of its 600 opticians stores in March. It put the vast majority of optical staff on furlough. Continue reading…

  • Chelsea set to beat Liverpool to £53m signing of RB Leipzig’s Timo Werner
    by Jacob Steinberg on June 4, 2020 at 6:33 pm

    Chelsea close to sealing five-year deal for forwardLiverpool linked with Werner but have not made a bidChelsea are close to signing Timo Werner after holding productive talks with the RB Leipzig forward, who is set to disappoint Liverpool by moving to Stamford Bridge for £53m. Related: Premier League plan fixture list with Everton-Liverpool set for first Sunday Continue reading…

  • $2bn global coronavirus vaccine fund announced at Gavi summit
    by Patrick Wintour Diplomatic editor on June 4, 2020 at 6:33 pm

    Alliance aims to ensure a vaccine is not just distributed to rich countries that can afford itCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA $2bn procurement fund aimed at ensuring that poorer countries can access doses of a potential coronavirus vaccine has been announced at a virtual summit hosted by the UK.The announcement was made at the third Gavi vaccine alliance replenishment summit, a virtual pledging event that separately raised $8.8bn, above the target of $7.4bn, for the private-public alliance’s general work on immunising millions of people worldwide from longstanding diseases such as measles. Continue reading…

  • Chemicals firm BASF biggest beneficiary of UK coronavirus loan scheme
    by Richard Partington Economics correspondent on June 4, 2020 at 6:26 pm

    German company among large firms using government-backed funding to help weather fallout of pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe German chemicals company BASF has emerged as the biggest beneficiary of the Bank of England’s emergency coronavirus loan scheme, borrowing £1bn in cheap government-backed funding.Threadneedle Street revealed for the first time the names of 53 big companies that have borrowed £16.2bn between them, amid rising pressure on the government to place tougher conditions on firms that receive state-backed support. Continue reading…

  • The Guardian view on Trump and the military: moment of decision | Editorial
    by Editorial on June 4, 2020 at 6:13 pm

    The US president’s desire to act the strongman poses urgent questions that America’s generals, voters and allies must all answerAmerican military force shaped the modern era. Sometimes it overthrew tyrannies and made the world safe, as in 1940s Europe. At other times it has made the world more dangerous, as in Vietnam and Iraq. In the civil war of the 1860s, the military preserved the Union at terrible but necessary cost. Since then, with a handful of exceptions and then mostly only at the request of state governors, the US military has been kept well out of domestic politics. America fiercely celebrates its military, but its laws place firm restrictions on military action within the United States itself.There is an overwhelmingly good reason for this caution. Military force, whether embodied in martial law or through the lethal power of arms and force, is incompatible with constitutional democracy, rights and justice. Poland discovered that in 1981. So did the democracy activists of China at Tiananmen Square in 1989. The people of countries like Egypt, Turkey, Thailand and Pakistan, where martial law has been common, know better than most what military rule entails. Lest there be any British smugness, remember also Northern Ireland, where the arrival of British troops in 1969 became as much the source of the nearly 40-year Troubles as their solution, especially after the Bloody Sunday shootings of civilians. Continue reading…

  • Ahmaud Arbery attacker used racial slur as jogger lay dying, court hears
    by Guardian staff and agency on June 4, 2020 at 6:04 pm

    Georgia state investigator makes claim in murder caseTravis and Greg McMichael and William ‘Roddie’ Bryan chargedA state investigator in Georgia on Thursday alleged that the white man accused of killing jogger Ahmaud Arbery was heard saying a racial slur as he stood over the mortally wounded man, moments after hitting him with three shots from a pump-action shotgun. Related: FBI investigating Ahmaud Arbery shooting as possible hate crime, lawyer says Continue reading…

  • Fewer than four in 10 cover face on UK public transport – Guardian survey
    by Diane Taylor, Josh Halliday and Libby Brooks on June 4, 2020 at 6:01 pm

    Survey of almost 800 travellers in three cities shows in some areas rate is just 10%Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEnsuring that every passenger on public transport wears a face covering will require a significant change to current behaviour – and potentially an uphill battle.A Guardian survey suggests that fewer than four in 10 people currently wear one, with young and middle-aged men the least likely to use them on trains, buses, trams and the tube. Continue reading…

  • Artificial Things review – Sophie Fiennes directs slow journey towards joy
    by Lyndsey Winship on June 4, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    Available onlineStopgap Dance Company’s disabled and non-disabled dancers create a mood of quiet suspension in an abandoned shopping centreHottest front-room seats: the best theatre and dance to watch onlineIn an empty shopping centre, against a backdrop of broken ceiling tiles, painted-out windows, shabby fittings and “Please pay here” signs, film-maker Sophie Fiennes gives us a drained palette of beige, grey and porridge white, peeling at the edges. It all lends an abandoned air to Stopgap Dance Company’s Artificial Things.Founded 23 years ago, Stopgap is an inclusive company bringing together disabled and non-disabled dancers. The result being dance that expands on the different ways bodies, and people, relate to one another. This film, made in 2018, is a half-hour reimagining of a 90-minute stage work, in which Fiennes has changed the setting and reordered the scenes of choreographer Lucy Bennett’s original to make, essentially, a new piece. The more fully realised stage version was about a group of people living in suffocating closeness; here the dramaturgy is watered down like the colour palette, but it does create a subtle mood of slow, quiet suspension, even if there’s not much meat on its bones. Continue reading…

  • Do you live in Newham? We want to hear from you
    by Guardian community team on June 4, 2020 at 5:53 pm

    Have you or your family been affected by Covid-19? Are you organising to help your community? What needs to happen now? We’re putting together the penultimate episode of Anywhere but Westminster’s Life in Lockdown series. Our starting point for this film will be the London borough of Newham, which has been one of the worst-hit areas in the UK during the coronavirus crisis.  Continue reading…

  • Do face coverings reduce risk and spread of coronavirus?
    by Hannah Devlin Science correspondent on June 4, 2020 at 5:49 pm

    As UK announces compulsory face coverings on public transport, what is scientific evidence behind measure?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverage Related: Face coverings to be made compulsory on public transport in England Continue reading…

  • Drew Brees’s tone-deaf comments on protests are both ignorant and dangerous
    by Melissa Jacobs on June 4, 2020 at 5:37 pm

    Only willful ignorance can explain the New Orleans Saints star’s ongoing conflation of kneeling during the national anthem in protest of police violence with disrespect for the military In the aftermath of George Floyd’s disturbing murder at the hands of four Minneapolis police officers that has ignited the world both literally and figuratively, the NFL has engaged in a refreshing, new tone: unification. Players of all skin colors have joined marches and donated millions of dollars to organizations fighting the increasingly clear atrocities of inequality in America. The black players, who comprise more than 70% of the league’s workforce, have shared their personal experiences encountering systemic racism, while their white counterparts have listened and publicly lent their support as allies.  Related: The NFL and Trump both reek of hypocrisy over George Floyd’s death Continue reading…

  • Hungary marks treaty centenary as Orbán harnesses ‘Trianon trauma’
    by Shaun Walker in Warsaw on June 4, 2020 at 5:34 pm

    PM uses settlement, which took away three-fifths of territory, for nationalist agendaChurch bells rang out across Budapest, public transport came to a halt and people observed a moment of silence as Hungary commemorated the centenary of the treaty of Trianon on Thursday.Signed in the aftermath of the first world war, the treaty still forms a major part of Hungary’s national identity and memories of the harsh settlement have helped fuel the nationalist agenda of the current prime minister, Viktor Orbán. Continue reading…

  • US urged to address racial injustice or risk further instability in new report
    by Lauren Gambino in Washington on June 4, 2020 at 5:33 pm

    International Crisis Group analysis implored Trump and officials to stop courting conflict with incendiary languageGeorge Floyd killing – latest US updatesSee all our George Floyd coverageA failure to confront the “deep pain and injustice borne by the African American community” in response to the police killing of George Floyd will result in further “division and instability” in the United States, according to a new analysis by the International Crisis Group.The organization, an international security thinktank based in Brussels, describes its mission over the past quarter-century as “working to prevent wars and shape policies that will build a more peaceful world”. Continue reading…

  • Hong Kong protesters hold banned Tiananmen vigil as anthem law is passed
    by Verna Yu in Hong Kong on June 4, 2020 at 5:31 pm

    Protesters defy police ban as legislation prohibits mockery of Chinese anthemThousands of people have defied a police ban in Hong Kong to mourn the victims of the Tiananmen Square massacre, after the city’s legislature passed a law criminalising the mockery of China’s national anthem.Many fear this year’s commemoration of the events of 4 June 1989 might be Hong Kong’s last, as China has approved a plan to impose national security laws on the semi-autonomous city that would prevent and punish “acts and activities” that threaten national security. Continue reading…

  • ECB agrees to inject additional €600bn into eurozone economy
    by Richard Partington on June 4, 2020 at 5:04 pm

    The single currency bloc is facing the deepest recession in memory and unprecedented job lossesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe European Central Bank has ramped up its coronavirus pandemic response by agreeing to inject an additional €600bn (£539.5bn) of emergency financial support into the Eurozone economy.Faced with the deepest recession in living memory and rapidly rising job losses across the single currency bloc, the ECB said it would increase the size of its quantitative easing bond-buying programme to €1.35tn. Continue reading…

  • NHS test-and-trace system ‘not fully operational until September’
    by Sarah Marsh on June 4, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Exclusive: chief operating officer told staff programme would be imperfect at launchCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe NHS coronavirus test-and-trace system designed to prevent a second deadly wave is not expected to work at full speed until September or October, the Guardian has learned.Tony Prestedge, the chief operating officer of the NHS scheme, admitted in a webinar to staff that the programme would be “imperfect” at launch, adding that he hoped it would be operational at a world-class level within three to four months. Continue reading…

  • Brazil set to overtake Italy as country with third-highest coronavirus deaths
    by Tom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro on June 4, 2020 at 4:47 pm

    Brazil records 1,349 deaths in day, with Mexico also registering over 1,000, as Latin American countries seek to reopen Brazil is set to overtake Italy as the country with the third-highest Covid-19 death toll after a record 1,349 fatalities took its total to more than 32,500.Brazil’s interim health minister made no immediate comment on the figures, which, unusually, were published late on Wednesday night in a move government critics suspect was designed to bury the bad news. The health ministry blamed “technical” problems for the delay. Continue reading…

  • Stephen Colbert: ‘Trump is a dictator fanboy’
    by Adrian Horton on June 4, 2020 at 4:40 pm

    Late-night hosts dissect Trump’s removal of non-violent protesters for a Bible photo op, his record disapproval rating and use of excessive forceOn Wednesday’s Late Show, Stephen Colbert opened with news that Minnesota’s attorney general, Keith Ellison, had elevated charges against police officer Derek Chauvin, who is charged with killing George Floyd last week by kneeling on his neck for over eight minutes. Ellison elevated Chauvin’s charges to second-degree murder and added charges of aiding and abetting murder to the other three officers on the scene. “So, activism works. Justice is possible – easy, peasy, hold protests for nine days straight in 80 American cities squeezy,” said Colbert. Continue reading…

  • Could the killing of George Floyd be a turning point for American denial? | Emma Brockes
    by Emma Brockes on June 4, 2020 at 4:39 pm

    This latest death at the hands of police has sparked a sense of emergency, as the cracks in the American story are further exposedIt was Don DeLillo, the novelist, who in the wake of 9/11 said of America, “the culture absorbs almost everything”. It’s a conservative reflex – to co-opt any rebellion into the country’s existing idea of itself – and as protests against the death of George Floyd roiled this week, you could see that reflex in action. Instagram filled with solidarity from white people that sounded a lot like personal branding. Corporations with terrible hiring records put out statements about standing together. A friend who works for a big company, on receiving a lachrymose global email from her CEO, said drily, “What is he talking about? They don’t even give us Martin Luther King Day off.” Related: Systemic racism and police brutality are British problems too | Kojo Koram Continue reading…

  • White youths arrested for bullying black boy in West Yorkshire
    by Helen Pidd North of England editor on June 4, 2020 at 4:36 pm

    Videos on social media show two white teenagers telling boy to kneel and kiss trainersTwo teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of racially aggravated offences after a number of videos circulated on social media showing a black boy being bullied in West Yorkshire.The videos, which have been viewed more than 1.5m times on Twitter, show a white teenage boy and a white teenage girl repeatedly shouting at the black boy to kneel and kiss their trainers. Continue reading…

  • Nicholas Daniel/Julius Drake – Wigmore Hall lunchtime series review
    by Andrew Clements on June 4, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    Wigmore Hall/BBC Radio 3The oboist and pianist premiered two brand new pieces in this wide-ranging and perfectly balanced lunchtime recitalNo one could accuse the Wigmore Hall’s lunchtime series of playing it too safe. There are plenty of surprises and novelties in the programmes to come, and oboist Nicholas Daniel’s recital with pianist Julius Drake included no less than three pieces being broadcast for the first time.All three are pervaded by a sense of fragility and loss. Two were only finished during the Covid lockdown – Huw Watkins’s Arietta suspends a swooping soaring melodic line over rippling accompaniments, while Michael Berkeley’s A Dark Waltz emerges haltingly from the penumbrous lower registers of the piano. The third was by Liszt – his Elégie No 1 is best known as a solo piano piece, though it’s sometimes heard in a version for cello and piano. Recently, though, it’s been discovered that it was first composed for cor anglais and, as Daniel showed, the drooping, rather Tristan-esque phrases suit that intrinsically melancholy instrument well. Continue reading…

  • As Britain lifts its lockdown, it’s vital our leaders admit their mistakes | Gaby Hinsliff
    by Gaby Hinsliff on June 4, 2020 at 4:20 pm

    Each step we take towards normality is an experiment, and any wrong move must be acknowledged and retraced quicklyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIt’s hardly as if they weren’t warned. When Jacob Rees-Mogg first started threatening to bring back parliament in person, the risks – both to medically vulnerable MPs and to the public, if it turned politicians into unwitting super-spreaders – were spelled out very clearly to him.But he pushed ahead anyway, and now we see the results. One visibly sweaty cabinet minister now self-isolating, and MPs travelling home wondering if they’re unwittingly bringing Covid-19 to their constituencies. And all to maintain an unconvincing fiction of life slowly returning to normal, while satisfying a popular demand that turns out barely to exist. Just 12% of Britons think MPs should have to vote in person in a pandemic, according to YouGov – which is remarkable given the depth of ill-feeling against politicians. Ending the remote parliament so soon looks like a mistake, and refusing to admit it bodes ill.  Continue reading…

  • ‘These women aren’t victims’: director turns the spotlight on garment workers
    by Annie Kelly on June 4, 2020 at 4:09 pm

    Based on true stories, Rubaiyat Hossain’s Made in Bangladesh challenges stereotypes while revealing the relentless pressure of fashion’s supply chainRubaiyat Hossain’s latest film, Made in Bangladesh, opens with a scene of pure, visceral panic: young garment workers trapped in a burning factory. Alarms blare, women scream and smoke fills the stairwells.“A fire or a building collapse is every garment worker’s greatest fear,” says Hossain. When filming the scene, the women seen desperately running for their lives didn’t need much direction.  Continue reading…

  • A junior doctor’s marathon – and other hopeful coronavirus stories
    by Caroline Davies on June 4, 2020 at 4:01 pm

    Doctor runs home to raise funds for PPE and NHS worker sees children after nine weeks apartCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA junior doctor says he has been overwhelmed with donations after running a marathon on his way home from his hospital shift to raise money for vital personal protection equipment (PPE).Dr Kieran Togher, 25, who works at the Luton and Dunstable hospital, ran to his home in Enfield after work on Wednesday, an exact distance of 26.3 miles (42km), to raise money for Covid Crisis Rescue UK . Continue reading…

  • History remixed: the rise of the anachronistic female lead
    by Adrian Horton on June 4, 2020 at 3:54 pm

    The lives of women from history, from Catherine the Great to Shirley Jackson, are being brought to the screen with a radical focus on character over factsIt is a point in favor of TV’s sprawling proliferation that one gets, in the course of a year, both a lush, serious historical drama starring Helen Mirren as Catherine the Great on HBO, and its tonal opposite, Hulu’s raucous, gleefully brutal The Great, which puts an asterisk right on the title card: “An Occasionally True Story.” The Great, developed by Tony McNamara, the writer of absurd court send-up The Favourite, cares little for the historical accuracy of the 18th-century Russian monarch. Its Catherine (Elle Fanning) arrives in the backward, hedonistic Russian court as a naive 19-year-old bride in 1761. The real Catherine was 35 and a mother by then, but that’s fine – free from the constraints of biography or pedantic seriousness, The Great’s occasional truth delivers, ironically, a more lasting impression of a real, flesh and blood princess – one slowly but determinedly amassing power, enlightened but ambitious to rule. Related: The Great review – gleefully garish new series from The Favourite writer Continue reading…

  • Is it safe to protest during a pandemic? Experts answer our questions
    by Danielle Renwick on June 4, 2020 at 3:18 pm

    Protests over the police killing of George Floyd have sparked health concerns, but many experts say police violence is its own kind of epidemicGeorge Floyd killing – latest US updatesSee all our George Floyd coverageProtests have erupted nationwide in response to the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May, and public health experts warn of a likely uptick in Covid-19 infections. “There is the concern that protests could be super spreader events,” said Kim Sue, a physician who has participated in demonstrations.And yet many health experts – aware of the risk – say they still support the protests, suggesting that police violence is its own kind of epidemic. We spoke with three of them. Continue reading…

  • Pamplona ‘wolf pack’ members convicted of separate sexual assault
    by Sam Jones in Madrid on June 4, 2020 at 3:10 pm

    Four found guilty of sexually abusing woman in southern city of Córdoba in May 2016Four of the five men who gang-raped a young woman at Pamplona’s bull-running festival in July 2016 have been given additional prison sentences after being convicted of sexually abusing another woman in southern Spain two months earlier.The Pamplona rape shocked the country and nationwide protests erupted after the five men were initially convicted of the lesser offence of sexual abuse. Continue reading…

  • Systemic racism and police brutality are British problems too | Kojo Koram
    by Kojo Koram on June 4, 2020 at 2:59 pm

    Those who argue that Black Lives Matter protesters are jumping on an American bandwagon wilfully miss the pointIt’s October 2019, and bestselling authors Douglas Murray and Lionel Shriver take to the stage for an event at Central Hall Westminster. Part of the way through their talk, Murray begins to rail against the 2016 British Black Lives Matter protests and what he sees as “the globalisation of a specific American racial issue”.“It was surreal to see Black Lives Matter marching down Oxford Street … with their hands in the air, doing the Black Lives Matter thing of ‘hands up, don’t shoot’, all escorted by unarmed British police officers,” Murray exclaims. The audience erupts with laughter at the punchline, satiated by the clear ridiculousness of Britons marching for a problem that doesn’t concern them. Continue reading…

  • Trump hankers for roar of the crowd while Biden takes campaign virtual
    by Daniel Strauss in Washington on June 4, 2020 at 2:21 pm

    Despite the pandemic, the president can’t wait to get back packed rallies while his Democratic rival practices caution. Each thinks he has a winning strategyDonald Trump wants to be nominated by a Republican national convention with all the trappings of a normal, packed event: the thronging crowds, the balloon drop, the scores of sideshow events. Meanwhile, former vice-president Joe Biden and senior Democratic officials are strongly considering a partially or completely virtual convention. Related: Can Joe Biden convince protesters he would be a ‘transformational’ president? Continue reading…

  • Donations to inclusive publishers’ appeal leap after George Floyd killing
    by Alison Flood on June 4, 2020 at 2:18 pm

    Pandemic fundraiser for Knights Of and Jacaranda has seen donations of more than £100,000 in the past weekMore than £100,000 has poured in from the public over the last week to help diverse independent publishers in the UK survive the coronavirus pandemic.Last month, inclusive publishers Jacaranda Books and Knights Of warned their income had reduced to almost zero after the outbreak closed bookshops and distributors, putting their futures at risk. They launched a crowdfunding appeal administered by the independent writing charity Spread the Word, looking to raise £100,000 to ensure their survival. Eighty per cent of donations go to the two presses, with the remaining 20% to other independent publishers in the UK. Continue reading…

  • Hannah Marks: ‘Usually, in movies, these two women would hate each other’
    by Louis Wise on June 4, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    The actor turned writer-director on her Booksmart-esque ‘womance’ Banana Split, and why her next film will be a robot road-tripWhen Hannah Marks was in her late teens, she went through her first breakup, as many do, and grieved it deeply, as many do. Then the actor met her ex’s new girlfriend at a party – and rather liked her. Marks, acting professionally since she was 12, knew a good idea when she saw one. “What happens when you don’t vilify that person, and then you actually like them and you become friends?” she asks down the phone from Los Angeles, a decade later. “That was really interesting to me, that platonic love story.” As she points out: “Usually, in movies, these two women would hate each other.”The result is Banana Split, a fizzy, oddball romcom that the 27-year-old Marks stars in, co-wrote and co-produced. The relationship between April (Marks) and Nick (Dylan Sprouse) is an amuse-bouche, sped through early on in a montage, before diving into the story proper – the giddy rapport, developed behind Nick’s back, between April and the new woman Clara (Liana Liberato). In its celebration of two-fingers-up female friendship, critics have somewhat inevitably dubbed it a “womance”. Continue reading…

  • Ministers considering renationalising England and Wales probation service
    by Jamie Grierson Home affairs correspondent on June 4, 2020 at 1:41 pm

    Exclusive: Move is latest attempt to unwind ‘disastrous’ 2014 changes under Chris GraylingMinisters are considering renationalising the entire probation service in England and Wales, the Guardian understands, in the latest twist in a long-running saga to unwind Chris Grayling’s disastrous changes to the sector.Under Grayling’s widely derided shake-up in 2014, the probation sector was separated into a public sector organisation managing high-risk criminals and 21 private companies responsible for the supervision of 150,000 low- to medium-risk offenders. Continue reading…

  • US police have a history of violence against black people. Will it ever stop?
    by Oliver Laughland US southern bureau chief on June 4, 2020 at 1:28 pm

    The bereaved and brutalized have been calling for justice for years but the Trump administration reversed Obama’s tentative steps towards reformGeorge Floyd killing – latest US updatesSee all our George Floyd coverageIn Ferguson, Missouri, Mike Brown’s body lay lifeless on the street for four hours after he was shot dead by a white officer. Witnesses described him holding his hands up in surrender before he was killed. In New York City, Eric Garner told a white officer who placed him in a banned chokehold that he could not breathe before he died. He repeated the phrase 11 times. Continue reading…

  • Britain’s quarantine plan for travellers is too little too late | Devi Sridhar
    by Devi Sridhar on June 4, 2020 at 1:16 pm

    As countries that implemented travel bans early on in the coronavirus pandemic begin to open up, the UK is only just getting startedCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen the next pandemic hits – and it’s a question of when, not if – it will be vital that we did all we could at this moment to learn the lessons taught to us by coronavirus. One key lesson has been the effectiveness of travel bans. Countries that managed to contain the virus effectively implemented immediate health screenings of new arrivals, 14-day quarantines for those entering the country and even full travel bans. Of the world’s population, 91% live in countries with current travel restrictions, and 39% of people live in countries whose borders are completely closed to non-citizens and non-residents. Continue reading…

  • ‘Way behind the curve’: test, trace and a local credibility gap
    by John Harris on June 4, 2020 at 1:07 pm

    Councils are supposed to play a big role in the coronavirus strategy, but do they have the means to do so?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageJust under a fortnight ago, council leaders across England received an email containing three attachments. It had been sent on behalf of Nadine Dorries, the health minister and former I’m A Celebrity … Get Me Out Of Here! contestant.Official material related to Covid-19 has frequently been full of numerical scales, shaded shapes and perplexing diagrams, and so it proved this time. As well as the promise of “an integrated and world-class Covid-19 test-and-trace service”, one of the documents featured four circles in different shades of green, and the words “test”, “enable”, “contain” and “trace”. Close by were two lines of text that sounded important, but baffled some of the people who read them. Continue reading…

  • Too little data for recommendations in Covid-19 BAME report, says minister
    by Aamna Mohdin on June 4, 2020 at 12:36 pm

    Kemi Badenoch tells Commons any action the government takes should be driven by evidenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePublic Health England was unable to make any recommendations in its report on BAME people and coronavirus because some of the data needed to do so was not available, a minister has said.Kemi Badenoch, the minister for women and equalities, told the Commons she wanted any action the government takes to be driven by evidence, and it was not “easy to go directly from analysis to making recommendations”. Continue reading…

  • Inside the George Floyd protests in New York: ‘we are not the problem’ – video
    by Tom Silverstone, Adam Gabbatt and Katie Lamborn on June 4, 2020 at 12:24 pm

    The police killing of George Floyd continues to ignite protests across the US. On 2 June, the Guardian embedded with activists as they marched through New York City to voice their outrage at Floyd’s death and the systematic racism that enabled itMoments of hope and solidarity from the George Floyd protests – videoMovement to defund police gains ‘unprecedented’ support across USSign up to our First Thing newsletterContinue reading…

  • Bafta TV awards nominations 2020: Netflix and HBO dominate at the BBC’s expense
    by Mark Lawson on June 4, 2020 at 12:17 pm

    There is little for the corporation to shout about on the shortlists. Spare a thought, too, for Jed Mercurio, Andrew Scott and Martin FreemanDue to his notoriously unreliable eyesight, Dominic Cummings may have had to read the shortlists for the British Academy Television awards a few times before he could be absolutely sure. But the prime minister’s chief adviser will be relieved that Benedict Cumberbatch has not been nominated for best actor for his portrayal of Cummings in Channel 4’s Brexit: The Uncivil War, which dramatised the best-known pre-Durham period in the life of the long-distance-driving No 10 fixer. Continue reading…

  • Unreliable data: how doubt snowballed over Covid-19 drug research that swept the world
    by Melissa Davey on June 4, 2020 at 12:04 pm

    A vast database from a little-known company called Surgisphere has influenced rapid policy shifts as the world seeks treatments for Covid-19. But as researchers began to examine it more closely, they became increasingly concerned Dr Carlos Chaccour had just woken up in Barcelona when he opened his laptop to read the latest Covid-19 research.Usually, he would start the day by meditating, but that was proving difficult in the middle of a global pandemic. Continue reading…

  • A foul smell and distancing hats: Thursday’s best photos
    by Guy Lane on June 4, 2020 at 12:03 pm

    The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world Continue reading…

  • Tom Jones’s 20 greatest songs – ranked!
    by Michael Hann on June 4, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    Ahead of his 80th birthday on Sunday, we run down the Welsh superstar’s biggest and best beltersTom Jones’s 2008 album 24 Hours was a mixed bag, with cheery efforts to recapture his swinging mojo (If He Should Ever Leave You) and a song from Bono and the Edge (Sugar Daddy). But best of all was this sombre, southern soul rereading of a Bruce Springsteen ballad about a veteran fighter. The metaphor is obvious, but the song is undeniable. Continue reading…

  • Genetics is not why more BAME people die of coronavirus: structural racism is | Winston Morgan
    by Winston Morgan on June 4, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    Yes, more people of black, Latin and south Asian origin are dying, but there is no genetic ‘susceptibility’ behind itFrom the start of the coronavirus pandemic, there has been an attempt to use science to explain the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on different groups through the prism of race. Data from the UK and the US suggests that people categorised as black, Hispanic (Latino) and south Asian are more likely to die from the disease.The way this issue is often discussed, but also the response of some scientists, would suggest that there might be some biological reason for the higher death rates based on genetic differences between these groups and their white counterparts. But the reality is there is no evidence that the genes used to divide people into races are linked to how our immune system responds to viral infections. Continue reading…

  • Crowning glory: the highlights of Dior’s hats – in pictures
    by As told to Jo Jones on June 4, 2020 at 11:56 am

    Christian Dior made the hat an essential part of his collections – and his successors have all reinvented it. Stephen Jones, milliner to the house since 1996, guides us through some of the treasures that appear in a new illustrated book Continue reading…

  • Love Island in the time of Corona: will an Aussie replacement suffice?
    by Stuart Heritage on June 4, 2020 at 11:00 am

    Plenty of reality shows have foreign counterparts, but while they are sometimes better, they are never quite what you expectRealistically, Love Island was never going to come back properly this year. After all, a socially distanced Love Island sounds about as fun as a Love Island where all the contestants have to wear clothes or are capable of independent thought. However, all is not lost. Love Island might have fallen to the coronavirus, but ITV has announced that it’ll be airing Love Island Australia in its place this summer.You probably have mixed feelings about this. On one hand, if you like Love Island then any Love Island is better than no Love Island. But on the other, ITV2 is broadcasting the first series of Love Island Australia, which aired in 2018, which means you might as well just read its Wikipedia page and be done with it. I did, and now I know who fought, who had sex, who won and how long they lasted in the real world. I also know that one of the games in the series is called Any Hole is a Goal, which sort of makes me want to watch it less. Continue reading…

  • ‘I ain’t waiting’: John Boyega shows movie stars what political engagement looks like
    by Peter Bradshaw on June 4, 2020 at 10:55 am

    His Hyde Park speech is a teachable moment in the history of race, racism and celebrity. He’s part of a vigorous, distinguished traditionJohn Boyega’s rousing Black Lives Matter speech wins praise and supportAlready, the sneery backlash has begun – as so much Trumpism is founded on that keynote of faux-underdog self-pity in the face of supposedly all-powerful liberalism. When actor John Boyega, from Star Wars and Attack the Block, addressed protesters at a Black Lives Matter rally in London’s Hyde Park, he said: “I’m speaking to you from my heart. Look, I don’t know if I’m going to have a career after this, but fuck that.” Social media exploded with knowing jeers and giggling gotchas about how, actually, Boyega had to protest, or else his career would suffer! People on Twitter who had shown no very obvious knowledge of or interest in the issue of civil rights or Hollywood politics before this, were suddenly intoxicated by their delicious paradox, and made Boyega’s comments the pretext of once again righteously smashing the 5G mast of liberal power.I don’t think Boyega’s comments will have any effect on his career, either good or bad. The career of this excellent actor was in great shape before this and it will continue to be in great shape. But vehement protests of this high-profile kind are not quite as commonplace as you might assume. Although protests about George Floyd have been replicated in cities around the world, there is no evidence of compulsory virtue-signalling from actors. In the US, there have been protests from Jamie Foxx and Michael B Jordan and many others, but it’s naive to imagine agents in LA calling their clients and ordering them to join in. For every celebrity or public figure who speaks out, many more keep their heads down. Continue reading…

  • St Petersburg death tally casts doubt on Russian coronavirus figures
    by Andrew Roth in Moscow on June 4, 2020 at 10:26 am

    City issues 1,552 more death certificates in May than last year, but Covid-19 toll was 171Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageNew mortality data from Russia’s second-largest city has reignited questions about whether the country’s official tally has discounted thousands of deaths tied to the coronavirus outbreak.St Petersburg issued 1,552 more death certificates this May than in the previous year, a nearly 32% rise indicating that hundreds of deaths tied to the pandemic are not reflected in the city’s official coronavirus death toll for the month of 171. Continue reading…

  • Can Joe Biden convince protesters he would be a ‘transformational’ president?
    by Lauren Gambino in Washington on June 4, 2020 at 10:15 am

    ‘It’s not enough to just be better than Trump’ Democratic hopeful told, amid anti-racist uprising sparked by killing of George FloydHours before peaceful protests against police brutality were forcibly dispersed so that Donald Trump could pose with a Bible in front of St John’s church, Joe Biden also went to church. Head bowed, Biden prayed with community leaders at Bethel African Methodist Episcopal church in his home town of Wilmington, Delaware. For days the nation had been convulsed over the killing of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man pinned under the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer for a fatal eight minutes and 46 seconds.  Continue reading…

  • EU leaders will intervene in Brexit talks in autumn, says German official
    by Daniel Boffey in Brussels and Lisa O’Carroll on June 4, 2020 at 10:01 am

    Michael Clauss says talks will be a focus from September and UK needs more realistic approachBritain must give away some sovereignty to secure free trade with the EU but Europe’s leaders will intervene in the negotiations in the autumn with the aim of sealing a compromise deal at a summit on 15 October, Germany’s ambassador in Brussels has said.Michael Clauss, whose country will take over the rolling presidency of the EU for the second half of the year, said there had been “no real progress” in the talks so far but predicted they would become the EU’s main political focus in September and October. Continue reading…

  • Trump’s Bible photo op splits white evangelical loyalists into two camps
    by Matthew Teague in Fairhope, Alabama on June 4, 2020 at 10:00 am

    Ardent supporters saw the photo op as a blow against evil while others saw the gesture as cynical and a ployOn Monday when Donald Trump raised overhead a Bible – the Sword of the Spirit, to believers – he unwittingly cleaved his loyal Christian supporters into two camps. His most ardent evangelical supporters saw it as a blow against evil and described his walk from the White House to St John’s Episcopal church, over ground violently cleared of protesters, as a “Jericho walk”. Continue reading…

  • Don’t forget the cocktails: how to have the perfect picnic
    by Tony Naylor on June 4, 2020 at 9:00 am

    Picnics will be a huge part of Britain’s physically distanced summer – but we usually get them spectacularly wrong. Experts share their tips on everything from food to booze – and where to sit Love it or loathe the wasps and lack of toilets, the outdoors is where it’s at this summer if you want to socialise in (relative) safety.Picnics are going to take on a greater significance, which – says Sam Herlihy, the co-owner of the quality sandwich outlet Sons + Daughters – requires us to confront an uncomfortable truth: “We pretend ‘the great English picnic’ is in our DNA, but we’re garbage at it.” Which raises the question: how can we up our picnic game? Continue reading…

  • ‘There are more births in the car park’: a midwife’s experience of the Covid-19 crisis
    by As told to Sarah Johnson on June 4, 2020 at 8:30 am

    These are strange times we are working in, but I haven’t felt frightened, and neither should the women I’m helpingThe word “breathe” has never been more potent than at the moment.The instruction to breathe is something midwives say an awful lot to women in labour. It’s also being said a great deal to patients on ventilators whose lungs have been taken over by Covid-19. Continue reading…

  • Meghan, Duchess of Sussex speaks out over George Floyd killing
    by Caroline Davies on June 4, 2020 at 8:06 am

    In graduation address for her old school, Meghan says ‘only wrong thing to say is nothing’George Floyd protests – live coverageGeorge Floyd coverage in fullThe Duchess of Sussex has described events in the US following the death of George Floyd as “absolutely devastating” and said she felt compelled to speak about it directly.In a video for a virtual graduation ceremony at her old high school, Meghan said that although she was nervous about speaking out, she had decided “the only wrong thing to say is nothing”. Continue reading…

  • Covid-19 makes it clearer than ever: access to the internet should be a universal right | Tim Berners-Lee
    by Tim Berners-Lee on June 4, 2020 at 8:00 am

    The internet eased lockdown life for millions. But millions more still can’t get online, and that’s fundamentally unfairMy 100-zip black backpack, previously the logistical and geek centre of my life, now sits neglected in a corner, not needed since Covid-19 abruptly halted my near-constant travel schedule.Life went on – with limited disruption, if not quite as normal. After all, I have enough space, equipment and internet connectivity to work comfortably from home. In some ways, life has become more efficient. Less jet lag. More sanity. Continue reading…

  • ‘No reader is too young to start’: anti-racist books for all children and teens
    by Aimée Felone on June 4, 2020 at 7:00 am

    It’s never too early to learn that racism is wrong and we should be doing something about it. These books will help show our kids how, writes publisher and bookseller Aimée FeloneDo the work: Layla F Saad’s anti-racist reading list The weight of the world seems heavier than ever right now. The incomprehensible killing of George Floyd has shone a bright light, yet again, on the pervasive racism faced daily by the black community. As we struggle to find the words to express our collective grief and pain, I’m reminded of Angela Davis’s call to action: “In a racist society it is not enough to be non-racist, we must be anti-racist.” As a publisher and bookshop owner I willingly take great responsibility for creating a space that is accessible to all. A space that shines a light on stories that seek to be inclusive and anti-racist.  Continue reading…

  • Pedal power: Zambia’s female farmers go further by bike – in pictures
    by Simon Davis on June 4, 2020 at 6:30 am

    A bicycle scheme is shaving hours off long journeys to get milk fresh to market, boosting women’s incomes and benefiting their whole communityAll photographs by Simon Davis and James Lovage/Unfold StoriesContinue reading…

  • Defrauded of £800,000 but we’re caught between the bank and the ombudsman
    by Anna Tims on June 4, 2020 at 6:00 am

    The bank will only pay half and the ombudsman has £150,000 limitAn elderly relative was defrauded of their life savings – over £800,000. After exhausting the complaints process with the bank, which offered no compensation, we referred our case to the Financial Ombudsman Service.The initial findings by its investigator recommend the bank compensate my relative in full. The bank has, instead, offered 50% of the amount instead of progressing the case to a final decision. Continue reading…

  • Lockdown in headlines, by artist Tatiana Trouvé – in pictures
    on June 4, 2020 at 6:00 am

    The Paris-based artist drew on newspaper front pages from 34 countries to create a powerful diary chronicling 40 days of quarantine Continue reading…

  • Five reasons why it’s not a great time to book a holiday abroad
    by Patrick Collinson on June 4, 2020 at 6:00 am

    From 14-day quarantines to arduous airport rules, there are many obstacles to navigateCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCash in the time of coronavirus: how to get in financial shape“Let’s fly,” says the email to me from Ryanair. “We’ve got 1,000 daily flights from 1 July.” Over at easyJet, there’s a “SUMMER SALE NOW ON! Over 1 million seats at £29.99 – book now”. Tui’s site is rather more restrained but it’s open for booking to all the usual destinations from the end of June. We all know bosses and shareholders of travel industry firms are desperate to restart their businesses. Plenty of their staff are too, as are quite a number of families who reckon the whole coronavirus thing is overblown.But before you book, consider the following facts. They may all change in the days and weeks to come but this is the situation right now: Continue reading…

  • Tiananmen Square witnesses remember an air of celebration, and then ‘Orwellian silence’
    by Lily Kuo in Beijing on June 4, 2020 at 5:57 am

    Student protesters and journalists in 1989 recall the joy and hope before the crackdownIt was mid-morning in Tiananmen Square in Beijing on 1 June, 1989. Someone had turned on a boombox playing 80s disco music, and people began to dance. A young couple spins in a small opening in the crowd. The woman smiles slightly, her eyes almost closed, as her partner in a loose dress shirt and blazer turns her. Around them, people are clapping.It is a photo that captures a side of the pro-democracy movement often overshadowed by what came after – the brutal military crackdown on the evening of 3 June and morning of 4 June. There is no official death toll but activists believe hundreds, possibly thousands, were killed. Continue reading…

  • Probably the best bar in the world: readers’ travel tips
    by Guardian readers on June 4, 2020 at 5:30 am

    Cocktails on a deck by the Saigon river, a beer on a Portuguese cliff face, and a Belgian bar that might leave you shoeless quench our tipsters’ thirstWe stumbled across Dulle Griet in Ghent last year. It is a fantastic traditional Flemish pub, serving over 500 beers from across the country. The decor was great and staff very friendly. The highlight of the bar is the MAX, a strong beer served in a huge two-litre glass. In an effort to stop people stealing or breaking their glasses, you must give a deposit of one shoe when ordering the MAX, a ceremonial bell is rung and the shoe is suspended in a basket above the bar until the glass is returned. They are limited to one per customer – definitely a wise choice!Mike L Continue reading…

  • Kurt Cobain with dolls’ heads: Mark Seliger’s best photograph
    by Interview by Edward Siddons on June 4, 2020 at 5:00 am

    ‘Things were going pretty darn well for him. Six months later, I was shocked to learn he had passed’I first photographed Nirvana in 1992 for Rolling Stone magazine in the midst of the band’s world tour for Nevermind, their breakthrough album. Kurt Cobain had something of a reputation, and the day before the shoot I asked Dave Grohl [the band’s drummer] and Krist Novoselic [bass] if they would be so kind as to ask Kurt to wear a T-shirt without writing or slogans on it. The next day, the guys arrived for the shoot laughing. Kurt was in sunglasses, with a sweater all buttoned up. When he took it off, it turned out he was wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the words: “Corporate Magazines Still Suck.” Thankfully, Rolling Stone saw the humour in it and ran it on the cover.  Continue reading…

  • ‘I’ve never felt so close to anyone this quickly’: the whirlwind romances of lockdown
    by Sirin Kale on June 4, 2020 at 5:00 am

    In March, couples in England were advised to move in together or stay apart to avoid coronavirus. What happened to those in new relationships who went for it?Hurtling down the motorway on a Triumph T120 with a backpack full of knickers, Jen Lewandowski thought: this is terrific. Lewandowski, 41, had met Tom Gidley, 51, just four times before she moved into his Ramsgate home at the beginning of the coronavirus lockdown in March. They originally met through work. Lewandowski had contacted Gidley, who is an artist, to ask if she could sell some of his paintings at an exhibition she was staging. When she collected the paintings from his studio in January, there was an instant connection. “She had an energy and real light about her,” says Gidley. After the show opened in March, they went for a drink, and then a cup of tea at Lewandowski’s kitchen table. Finally, Lewandowski, who lives in London, visited him for the weekend. Then the lockdown measures were announced. “I said: ‘Look, why don’t you just come down here?’” says Gidley. “Everything’s getting a bit strange.” She agreed, and Gidley collected her on his motorcycle. Since that high-speed jaunt, their relationship has barely slackened in pace. They have spent the entire lockdown together, said “I love you” to each other within days and are in general horribly in love. “Isn’t it wild?” giggles Lewandowski. “It is quite whirlwind, but it feels right, and we’re going with it.” Continue reading…

  • How a small Spanish town became one of Europe’s worst Covid-19 hotspots
    by Giles Tremlett on June 4, 2020 at 5:00 am

    In the northern region of La Rioja, one medieval town has suffered a particularly deadly outbreak. And in such a tight-knit community, suspicion and recrimination can spread as fast as the virus. By Giles TremlettWhen we first spoke, in mid-April, María José Dueñas began weeping within seconds. Her parents’ home town, Santo Domingo de La Calzada, had the worst death rate from coronavirus in Spain, she told me on the phone. “I’m so scared,” she said. Dueñas told stories of police clambering through windows to rescue the dying, who were too weak to open their doors. Regional politicians, meanwhile, refused to give town-by-town figures for the dead, stoking anxiety and encouraging conspiracy theories. Santo Domingo’s locked-down residents, she claimed, were being deliberately kept in the dark as the virus silently stalked the town.Dueñas does not live in Santo Domingo, a town of 6,300 people set among patchwork fields of cereal crops in the northern Spanish region of La Rioja. She was born there, but now lives 28 miles away in Logroño, the capital of this wealthy region, best known for the rich red wines that bear its name. Her angry, sometimes wildly conspiratorial outbursts on local Facebook groups – some of which have been deleted against her will – mean not all her old neighbours will welcome her back. Continue reading…

  • From Anfield to Cheltenham: did major events cost lives? – podcast
    by Presented by Anushka Asthana with David Conn and Simon Renoldi; produced by Mythili Rao and Axel Kacoutié; executive producers Phil Maynard and Nicole Jackson on June 4, 2020 at 2:00 am

    A series of high-profile sporting events went ahead as scheduled in mid-March even as Covid-19 was being declared a pandemic. The Guardian’s David Conn investigates the scientific reasoning behind the decision, while Liverpool fan Simon Renoldi reflects on the loss of his father In the hours before Liverpool faced Atlético Madrid at Anfield in a crucial Champions League match in March, the WHO declared Covid-19 a pandemic. But like other major events in Britain at the time, the government was content to let the match go ahead, allowing upwards of 50,000 people – many travelling from Madrid – to gather in close proximity. One of those there that night was Simon Renoldi, who tells Anushka Asthana that days later he took to his bed with all the symptoms associated with Covid-19. Shortly afterwards, his father, who worked with him in the family pub, fell ill and died. Continue reading…

  • How London united for George Floyd and Black Lives Matter – video
    by Aamna Mohdin, Lisa O’Carroll, Jamie Macwhirter and Nikhita Chulani on June 3, 2020 at 10:43 pm

    Thousands of protesters have marched through central London in an overwhelmingly peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration sparked after the police killing of George Floyd in America.The demonstrators, the vast majority of whom were under 30, chanted: ‘No justice, no peace, no racist police’, ‘I can’t breathe’ and ‘the UK is not innocent’, in a lockdown-defying demonstration that was largely organised through word of mouth and social media away from established anti-racism groups.Thousands gather in London for George Floyd protestContinue reading…

  • Moments of hope and solidarity from the George Floyd protests – video
    by Monika Cvorak Nikhita Chulani on June 3, 2020 at 3:22 pm

    Cities across the US witnessed another night of protests despite widespread curfews a week after George Floyd’s death. Among the violence and anger, moments of peace and hope have emerged as some police forces have shown solidarity with protesters, and anti-racism demonstrations have spread around the globeGeorge Floyd protests – latest updatesSee all our coverageContinue reading…

  • ‘It’s an exciting beginning’: Venice opens to tourists
    by John Brunton on June 3, 2020 at 2:55 pm

    As Italy eases restrictions further, we report from Venice, where hotels and restaurants are eager to welcome back overseas visitors but some fear a return to mass tourism‘We leapt at the chance of visiting Venice. The idea of seeing it with hardly any people was too good an opportunity to miss.” Marco Schmandt and Nina Goretzko are standing outside Venice’s railway station, checking Google Maps for directions to their B&B.The pair are German students who arrived in February from Berlin to study at Florence University, where they have been in lockdown since March. “I have been several times to Venice but this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. The train was no problem – we just had to wear masks – and now here we are. What is more we found a friendly family-owned B&B, just off Piazza San Marco, who offered us 50% discount, so we are able to take it for four days,” says Marco Continue reading…

  • ‘Hands up, don’t shoot’: how modern athletes have protested racial injustice – video
    by Nicholas Williams & Nikhita Chulani on June 3, 2020 at 12:18 pm

    The sporting world has been echoing the global outrage over the death of George Floyd. Throughout the past decade sport stars, and in particular black athletes, have been able to use their platform to speak out. Here’s a look at previous times they’ve called out racial injusticeThe NFL and Trump both reek of hypocrisy over George Floyd’s deathGeorge Floyd’s killing matters too much for corporate sport’s on-brand insincerityContinue reading…

  • How to make caesar salad – recipe | Felicity Cloake’s masterclass
    by Felicity Cloake on June 3, 2020 at 11:00 am

    A guide to making the classic American salad that was, in fact, invented by an Italian restaurateur in MexicoDespite its imperial name, caesar salad was created in 1920s Mexico to feed the hordes of thirsty Americans forced across the border by prohibition. Wanting to relieve the pressure on his kitchen, restaurateur Caesar Cardini came up with a recipe simple enough to be prepared by his waiters instead. The fact it’s also salty and rich enough to pair perfectly with a cold beer is no doubt mere coincidence.Prep 15 min, plus infusing timeCook 15 minServes 4 Continue reading…

  • World Oceans Day: tell us about issues affecting your local ocean
    by Jessie McDonald and Guardian community team on June 3, 2020 at 10:55 am

    World Oceans Day is a moment to celebrate the ocean and reflect on how to protect it. We’d like to know what matters most to youHundreds of events around the world will mark World Oceans Day on 8 June, from beach cleanups in Morocco, to live streams from conservationists in Timor-Leste, to an exhibit of artwork created from marine debris in Hawaii.This year there is a focus on calling for world leaders to commit to protecting 30% of oceans by 2030, to combat the climate crisis and protect marine biodiversity. Continue reading…

  • From Greta to musclemen: the Portrait of Humanity shortlist – in pictures
    on June 3, 2020 at 6:00 am

    A jockey in Belgrade, a barber in Havana, a famous young eco-warrior in Quebec … the Portrait of Humanity prize captures the many vibrant faces of humanity around the world. Here’s the 2020 shortlist Continue reading…

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