Opinion Drama

  • Police fire teargas as gilets jaunes protests return to Paris
    by Agence France-Presse on January 18, 2020 at 10:39 pm

    Clashes come on 45th day of strike with 59 arrests and claims police beat protesterFrench police fired teargas under a rain of projectiles, used stun grenades and arrested dozens of people on Saturday as thousands of “yellow vest” anti-government protesters returned to the streets of Paris.Demonstrators shouted slogans denouncing the police, the president, Emmanuel Macron, and his pension reforms that have triggered the longest French transport strike in decades. Continue reading…

  • Ash Barty can buck trend of home pressure at Australian Open
    by Simon Cambers on January 18, 2020 at 10:08 pm

    Hewitt, Rafter and Philippoussis fell short, Stosur buckled under the weight and Dokic only made the last eightAnyone who has spent any time in Melbourne over the past week cannot have failed to notice Ash Barty. The 23-year-old’s face adorns posters at the airport and across the city. The hopes of a nation, starved of a singles champion at their home grand slam for more than 40 years, are stamped across billboards and even in jewellery shops where the limited edition watch she wears is being sold.In a country that loves its sporting heroes like no other, Barty is as popular as any of them, if not more so. Down to earth, humble and gutsy, she epitomises all Australians recognise in a true sporting icon. But what has the country and the city even more excited is that in two weeks’ time, if things go her way, the world No 1 could make another piece of personal history by lifting the women’s title at the Australian Open. Continue reading…

  • Johnson will defy US and allow use of Huawei, says top security adviser
    by Michael Savage on January 18, 2020 at 10:05 pm

    Chinese firm poised to help build UK’s 5G phone network despite warnings about spyingBoris Johnson is likely to approve the use of Huawei technology in the UK’s new 5G network against the pleas of the US government, a former national security adviser has said.Sir Mark Lyall Grant, who was Theresa May’s national security adviser, said that the security services had repeatedly concluded over several years that they were able to mitigate any potential threats posed by the Chinese technology. Continue reading…

  • Boy kills four and wounds one in Utah’s worst mass shooting since 2007
    by Associated Press in Grantsville, Utah on January 18, 2020 at 9:55 pm

    Killings are first homicides in Grantsville for 20 years, police sayGovernor: ‘Parents and grandparents, secure your firearms!’ A boy armed with a gun killed three children and a woman in a Utah home then accompanied a fifth victim to a hospital where he was arrested, police said on Saturday.Police were trying to piece together what happened leading up to the shooting in Grantsville on Friday night. Investigators believed the victims were all related. Continue reading…

  • The United Kingdom is too precious to be lost to narrow nationalism | Gordon Brown
    by Gordon Brown on January 18, 2020 at 9:24 pm

    Nations and regions must join forces to ensure a healthy future for the unionIf the United Kingdom is to survive, it will have to change fundamentally, so that Scotland does not secede and our regions can once again feel part of it. Related: ‘Constitutional revolution’ needed to rescue the union, warns Gordon Brown Continue reading…

  • ‘Constitutional revolution’ needed to rescue the union, warns Gordon Brown
    by Michael Savage on January 18, 2020 at 9:24 pm

    Ex-prime minister calls for a radical alternative to nationalism to stop Scotland seceding and backs calls for elected senate to replace the House of LordsOnly a radical constitutional revolution can stop the union from unravelling and end the alienation felt by voters in the UK’s poorest regions, Gordon Brown warns today. Related: The United Kingdom is too precious to be lost to narrow nationalism Continue reading…

  • National Archives sorry for blurring anti-Trump signs in Women’s March photo
    by Victoria Bekiempis in New York on January 18, 2020 at 9:08 pm

    Archives admits it altered image that contained critical signsWashington institution: ‘We made a mistake’The US National Archives apologized on Saturday after it emerged that a photo of the Women’s March included in signage for an exhibition on women’s suffrage had been altered to blur anti-Trump signs. Related: Alan Dershowitz: Trump impeachment acquittal would make me unhappy Continue reading…

  • Johnson to cabinet: shape up or I’ll sack you within weeks
    by Toby Helm and Michael Savage on January 18, 2020 at 9:06 pm

    Top ministers are warned to stay off TV with reshuffle alert part of plan by Dominic CummingsBoris Johnson is to tell cabinet ministers that they must focus all their energy on developing policies for post-Brexit Britain – or face the sack in a wide-ranging cabinet reshuffle within weeks.In an extraordinary move, Johnson will tell his most senior ministers that they must concentrate on “delivery” and hard work that will help “level up” the country, rather than “touring TV studios” and trying to raise their personal profiles in the media. Continue reading…

  • Harry and Meghan to drop HRH titles and repay £2.4m
    by James Tapper on January 18, 2020 at 8:27 pm

    Duke and Duchess of Sussex will give back taxpayers’ money spent renovating their home and drop official dutiesAnalysis: couple sought half-in half-out deal, but are ‘out’The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will give up using their Royal Highness titles and return £2.4m to the taxpayer to cover the costs of refurbishing their Windsor home as they leave their roles as senior member of the royal family.The Queen said last night in a statement that this “constructive and supportive way forward” would allow the Sussexes “to start building a happy and peaceful new life”. In a rebuff to critics of her granddaughter-in-law, the Queen added that she was “particularly proud of how Meghan has so quickly become one of the family”. Continue reading…

  • Former SDP leader and Lib Dem leader Robert Maclennan dies
    by PA Media on January 18, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    Peer led the SDP in the 1980s as it carried out talks to merge with the Liberals Lord Robert Maclennan of Rogart, former leader of the Social Democrat party, who also served as joint interim leader of the Liberal Democrats, has died.The peer led the SDP in the late 80s as it carried out negotiations to merge with the Liberal party. Lord Maclennan then became joint interim leader of the merged party. He served as an MP from 1966 to 2001. Continue reading…

  • Tennessee governor seeks to amend law honouring leader of Ku Klux Klan
    by Associated Press in Memphis on January 18, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    Nathan Bedford Forrest was leading Confederate generalRepublican Bill Lee will introduce legislation regarding holidayTennesse governor Bill Lee will introduce legislation to amend a law requiring the state to honor Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general who went on to lead the Ku Klux Klan. Related: Nikki Haley claims otherwise innocuous Confederate flag was ‘hijacked’ by killer Continue reading…

  • Ole Gunnar Solskjær is not the right manager for Manchester United | Jonathan Wilson
    by Jonathan Wilson on January 18, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    There has been little sign of improvement since Solskjær took over and he looks ill-equipped to turn things aroundO n Friday 5 March 1909, Manchester United went to Burnley for an FA Cup quarter-final. The pitch was frozen, there was heavy snow and with 18 minutes remaining the referee, Herbert Bamlett, decided the match couldn’t go on. For United, the abandonment was fortunate: they had been 1-0 down but won the rearranged game 3-2 and went on, for the first time, to lift the FA Cup.Bamlett, having refereed the 1914 FA Cup final, turned his hand to management, taking charge of Oldham, Wigan Borough and Middlesbrough, guiding the latter to the verge of promotion when, in April 1927, he was named manager of United. Continue reading…

  • Saracens will be relegated at end of season, Premiership Rugby confirms
    by Paul Rees on January 18, 2020 at 7:35 pm

    • Club will be playing in Championship next season• Exeter chief: ‘They cheated. I’m upset it has taken this long’Saracens will be relegated from the Premiership at the end of the season after a fourth salary-cap breach.The reigning champions, who in November were fined more than £5m and docked 35 Premiership points for exceeding the cap in the previous three seasons, accepted they would not come in within the £7m cap at the end of the season. Continue reading…

  • Jess Phillips claims Labour leadership rivals ‘kept quiet’ on antisemitism
    by Toby Helm, political editor on January 18, 2020 at 7:22 pm

    Birmingham MP’s accusations force other contenders to defend their records during hustings for leadershipJess Phillips has accused her rivals in the race to succeed Jeremy Corbyn of “keeping quiet” about antisemitism, as the party’s failure to root out racism in its own ranks triggered heated exchanges at the first leadership hustings.For the first 40 minutes, the five surviving contenders engaged in civilised debate and avoided any personal criticism of one another, broadly agreeing on the shortcomings of the last election manifesto and the need to end factionalism. But, after the panel was asked about antisemitism, Phillips’s remarks changed the mood . Continue reading…

  • Harry Dunn: police demand urgent meeting with military base commander
    by PA Media on January 18, 2020 at 7:21 pm

    Northamptonshire chief constable makes call after footage emerges of incident near base with vehicle on wrong side of roadNorthamptonshire chief constable Nick Adderley has demanded an urgent meeting with the commander of the military base where the American woman wanted over the death of Harry Dunn was stationed.The move came after dramatic footage of another vehicle on the wrong side of the road near RAF Croughton emerged and police revealed details of a separate incident in which a police vehicle was struck by a car being driven on the wrong side of the road in October. Continue reading…

  • No screening for new Sars-like virus at UK airports – yet
    by Mark Townsend and Robin McKie on January 18, 2020 at 7:20 pm

    Experts decide no need for checks as member of Coronavirus family infects up to 1,700 in ChinaHealth officials have ruled out introducing screening for passengers at UK airports, despite mounting fears over a deadly new virus from China. Three big US airports yesterday announced they would introduce screening. Related: Expert questions effectiveness of coronavirus airport screening Continue reading…

  • Bushfire-destroyed homes should not be rebuilt in riskiest areas, experts say
    by Luke Henriques-Gomes on January 18, 2020 at 7:00 pm

    Planning experts call for state governments to buy back land from people in most bushfire-prone areasState governments have been warned against promising to recreate some communities destroyed by the bushfire crisis and urged to consider preventing homeowners from rebuilding their homes in the riskiest areas.Three planning experts, including two who appeared on a planning panel convened for the Victorian Black Saturday royal commission, told Guardian Australia to avoid repeating what they considered the mistakes of past bushfire recoveries. Continue reading…

  • Right fire for right future: how cultural burning can protect Australia from catastrophic blazes
    by Lorena Allam on January 18, 2020 at 7:00 pm

    Traditional knowledge has already reduced bushfires and emissions in the top end, so why isn’t it used more widely? Indigenous fire practitioners have warned that Australia’s bush will regenerate as a “time bomb” prone to catastrophic blazes, and issued a plea to put to use traditional knowledge which is already working across the top end to reduce bushfires and greenhouse gas emissions.“This is a time bomb ticking now because all that canopy has been wiped out,” says Oliver Costello of the national Indigenous Firesticks Alliance. Continue reading…

  • The uncomfortable truths about Roger Scruton’s conservatism | Kenan Malik
    by Kenan Malik on January 18, 2020 at 7:00 pm

    The late philosopher could wield an elegant argument, but his views were often uglyI first met Roger Scruton almost 20 years ago at a symposium in Sweden. I admired the eloquence with which he could talk about Kant and the elegance of his writing on beauty. I learned from his conservatism, even as I disagreed with what he said. But although I got to know him quite well over the years, our relationship was always fraught. For there was another Roger Scruton, not the philosopher but the polemicist. For all his warmth and generosity, and for all the poise of his writing, his views were often ugly. “Whatever its defects,” Scruton wrote in his memoir Gentle Regrets, “my life has enabled me to find comfort in uncomfortable truths.” His death last week seems an appropriate moment to reflect on the “uncomfortable truths” of Scruton’s conservatism, and on the relationship between the philosopher and the polemicist.It was Scruton the polemicist who became the founding editor of the Salisbury Review, established in 1982 to defend a traditional conservatism that many felt was being eroded by the Thatcherite revolution. Continue reading…

  • Dom Bess: ‘I thought about all 10 a little – but 10 is a bit greedy’
    by Chris Stocks in Port Elizabeth on January 18, 2020 at 6:57 pm

    • England off-spinner admits to dreaming of a famous record• Bess still aiming for nine-wicket haul against South AfricaDom Bess said he dreamed of taking all 10 South African wickets as he enjoyed the finest moment of his career on day three of the third Test at St George’s Park.The 22-year-old off-spinner, playing in this series only because of the illness to Jack Leach that led to his Somerset team-mate flying home last Thursday, claimed his first five-wicket haul in Tests on a rain-hit day that ended with the hosts reaching the close on 208 for six in response to England’s first innings of 499 for nine declared. Continue reading…

  • Trump lets soldiers get away with murder. That mustn’t happen here | Nick Cohen
    by Nick Cohen on January 18, 2020 at 6:30 pm

    Boris Johnson should not seek protection for UK military personnel accused of war crimesThe International Spy Museum in Washington DC features a waterboard used to make petrified detainees think their interrogators are drowning them. “Would you be willing to have the US government torture suspected terrorists if they may know details about future attacks?” it asks visitors.The US Senate found in 2014 that the waterboarding, the beating, the stripping, the sleep deprivation and the threats to prisoners’ families produced no “unique” and “valuable” intelligence. It succeeded only in driving inmates half-mad and disgracing the Bush administration and the CIA. Continue reading…

  • Facebook apologises for Xi Jinping offensive name translation gaffe
    by Reuters on January 18, 2020 at 6:25 pm

    Problem arises in translation of leader’s name from BurmeseTech giant ‘sincerely apologises for offence this has caused’ Facebook said on Saturday it was working to find out how Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s name appeared as “Mr Shithole” in posts on its platform when translated into English from Burmese, apologising for any offence caused and saying the problem had been fixed. Related: ‘Hong Kong is at a crossroads’: inside prison with the student who took on Beijing Continue reading…

  • Lib Dems will have new leader in place by July
    by Nadeem Badshah on January 18, 2020 at 6:13 pm

    Party’s timetable to replace Jo Swinson allows it to focus on May’s local electionsThe Liberal Democrats have announced they will have a new leader in place in July to succeed Jo Swinson.The party’s federal board set out a timetable on Saturday that nominations for candidates would open on 11 May and close on 28 May. The ballot for the new leader will start on 18 June and conclude on 15 July. Continue reading…

  • Donald Trump’s impeachment – cartoon
    by Chris Riddell on January 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    What the Republican party knows, but isn’t saying… Continue reading…

  • Maaza Mengiste: ‘The language of war is always masculine’
    by Alex Preston on January 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    The Ethiopian-born novelist on her book about the female fightback against Mussolini’s invasion of her homeland, why Instagram blurs the vision, and the lure of Moby-DickMaaza Mengiste’s second novel, The Shadow King, is a reimagination of Italy’s invasion of Ethiopia. Told from a range of perspectives, it focuses on the experience of the Ethiopian women who played a vital role in winning the war, as well as that of the Italian soldiers and the exiled king, Haile Selassie. Mengiste was born in Ethiopia in 1974, but her family fled the Ethiopian revolution when she was a child (a history she explored in her first novel, Beneath the Lion’s Gaze). She lives in New York and spoke to us from Zanzibar.Your first novel clearly drew on personal history. Did this new subject feel more distant from your own experience?It was not until I was well into my research for this book, when I was on a trip to Ethiopia, just visiting some of the locations where the battles were set, that my mother very casually mentioned the story of my great-grandmother who had enlisted to fight on the frontlines. Continue reading…

  • Trump claims Suleimani was ‘saying bad things’ about US before deadly strike
    by Martin Pengelly in New York on January 18, 2020 at 5:53 pm

    President, in audio obtained by CNN from Republican event at Mar-a-Lago, gives account of drone strike that killed Iranian general Addressing Republican donors at his Florida resort on Friday night, Donald Trump said Qassem Suleimani was “saying bad things about our country” before the US president authorised the drone strike which killed the Iranian general and pitched the Middle East to the brink of war. Related: Iran to send crashed plane’s flight recorders abroad for analysis Continue reading…

  • Billie Eilish: the candid, self-aware voice of a generation takes on 007
    by Rebecca Nicholson on January 18, 2020 at 5:30 pm

    The 18-year-old is the youngest person to sing a Bond theme – but she has handled a year of supernova fame with a maturity beyond her yearsAt 18, Billie Eilish will be the youngest artist ever to perform a title song for an 007 movie – a refreshingly youthful pick for the often traditional Bond machine. “It feels crazy to be a part of this in every way,” she said last week. “James Bond is the coolest film franchise ever to exist. I’m still in shock.”The singer has written and recorded the theme for the forthcoming film, No Time To Die, and follows Adele and Sam Smith, who both won an Oscar for their efforts. She is the first teenager ever to tackle a Bond song. Continue reading…

  • What delights will be laid on for a joyful nation at the forthcoming Festival of Brexit? | Catherine Bennett
    by Catherine Bennett on January 18, 2020 at 5:30 pm

    A blue passport on the fourth plinth, dog shows in abandoned libraries, a Wetherspoon literary prize? We can but hopePerhaps all anyone needs to know about the Festival of Brexit, which really is going to take place in 2022, is that its earliest recorded champion is Jacob Rees-Mogg. Love Jacob, scourge of the liberal metropolitan elite, and you’ll love his idea of fun.“A Festival of Brexit would be excellent,” he said, early in 2018. “There should be a huge celebration and in the spirit of friendship of our European neighbours we should drink lots of champagne to say that although we may be leaving the European Union, we don’t dislike Europe.” And the brand? Unspecified, though for peers we know Mogg insists on “the highest quality”. Continue reading…

  • Luxury travel: 50 wealthy tourists, eight countries … and one giant carbon footprint
    by Rupert Neate on January 18, 2020 at 5:10 pm

    Despite the climate crisis, ‘no emission spared’ round-the-world holidays in private jets are selling outForget cruises. The super-rich have found a new way to see the world in the luxurious style of an ocean liner but taking a fraction of the time: private jet round-the-world tours.This week, 50 members of the wealthy elite will board a privately chartered Boeing 757 to begin a 24-day guided tour of the globe, taking in Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, the Galápagos islands and mountain gorillas in Rwanda. Continue reading…

  • Clare Balding pulls out of arms trade dinner
    by Jamie Doward on January 18, 2020 at 5:06 pm

    Campaign group urged broadcaster to rethink over companies’ role in Yemen civil warThe broadcaster Clare Balding, who fronted an emergency appeal for victims of the Yemen crisis, has pulled out of speaking at an arms industry annual dinner attended by many of the companies whose weapons are fuelling the country’s civil war.She was due to host the ADS Group dinner at an undisclosed location in London. Tickets for the event – whose previous speakers have included the broadcaster Jeremy Vine and the Labour former cabinet minister Alan Johnson – cost up to £470 each. Continue reading…

  • Iran to send crashed plane’s flight recorders abroad for analysis
    by Emma Graham-Harrison on January 18, 2020 at 5:05 pm

    Black boxes will first be sent to Ukraine after Tehran relented under pressure from KyivIran will send the black box flight recorders from the passenger jet it accidentally shot down abroad for analysis, a senior investigator has said.The recorders will first be sent to Ukraine, the plane’s home base, where French, Canadian and US experts will help examine them, the semi-official Tasnim news agency reported. Continue reading…

  • Lecturer says she faced online abuse after Question Time clash with Laurence Fox
    by Jamie Doward on January 18, 2020 at 5:04 pm

    Actor was described as a ‘white privileged male’ in row over coverage of Duchess of SussexA mixed-race university lecturer accused of being racist by the white actor Laurence Fox has been bombarded with hate messages via social media, she has told the Observer.Rachel Boyle, a researcher on race and ethnicity at Edge Hill University in Lancashire, clashed with Fox during a TV discussion about the press’s treatment of the Duchess of Sussex. Continue reading…

  • The magic of mushrooms in arts – in pictures
    by Jonathan Chan on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    “I noticed so many artists working with fungi,” says curator Francesca Gavin, “I wanted to learn why.” This has led to a new Somerset House show, Mushrooms: The Art, Design and Future of Fungi (30 January to 26 April), a 130-year cultural history featuring artists and designers including Cy Twombly, Carsten Höller, Beatrix Potter, Tom Dixon and Takashi Murakami. “I want people to leave the show inspired by fungi,” Gavin says, “and with a little more knowledge of their importance to the planet’s survival.” Continue reading…

  • Eye candy: Jarvis Cocker on the joy of vintage sweet wrappers
    by Jarvis Cocker on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    The vivid packaging of yesteryear hooked children with images of space travel, pop stars and smoking, as seen in a new book showcasing the bounty of avid collector John TownsendBefore we get on to aspects of design, let’s just take a little time to think about what these wrappers actually contained. A generation of children raised on bubble gum, fizzy drinks and sweet cigarettes – in the days before sugar tax, when E numbers were a signifier of quality and sophistication. It’s a wonder any of us who lived through this era have any teeth left at all.All these products were aimed at kids – but they gave a peculiar foretaste of the adult world we could expect to grow up into. It would seem the main thing we were expected to do as adults was smoke – the aforementioned sweet cigarettes, coconut tobacco (my personal favourite), liquorice pipes and grotesque chocolate cigars. Career options, meanwhile, were law enforcer, space explorer, racing driver, footballer or pop star. Failing that, you could always become a monster. No wonder we couldn’t wait to grow up. Continue reading…

  • Sheku Kanneh-Mason: ‘I once made pasta in a kettle. I wouldn’t recommend it’
    by John Hind on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    The award-winning cellist talks about eating with his six siblings, the post-concert pint and what he ate at Harry and Meghan’s weddingI’ve got five sisters and one brother. That made me eat very quickly. I had the chair in the middle, on the side where you entered the room; we always had the same seating arrangement. If there were nine pieces of chicken, we were served from oldest to youngest child. I’m the third eldest.Me and my older brother Braimah are a year apart and shared a bedroom back in Nottingham. We used to set the alarm early to go down for what remained of, say, last night’s pudding. Sometimes we’d sneak down at 6am and someone would already have had it. Continue reading…

  • Ben Gorham: ‘With Byredo I wanted a more inclusive approach to luxury’
    by Scarlett Conlon on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    After his career as a basketballer ended, Ben Gorham leapt into a whole new world – and set up the luxury brand ByredoHe has shops on the coolest streets of New York, Paris, London and Seoul, with two Beijing flagships having opened last year. He’s good mates with Louis Vuitton’s Virgil Abloh, Burberry’s Riccardo Tisci and Kanye West, and has Naomi Campbell and Edward Enninful RSVPing to his launch parties around the world. But Ben Gorham still might be one of the most influential people you’ve never heard of.You are, however, likely to be familiar with his brainchild, Byredo. The brand is, after all, largely responsible for the reason you may have coveted a designer candle or boutique perfume in the last decade. Since its launch as a fragrance brand in 2006, it has become a byword for independent cool, with multiple new categories – including handbags, eyewear, trainers, men’s tailoring and, most recently, jewellery – taking it from modest to major player. Continue reading…

  • The only diet you can stick with is one you can enjoy
    by Rachel Cooke on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Dry January, Veganuary … when it all gets a bit much, reach for something simple like shepherd’s pie or mushroom soupBy the time you read this, it will all be over: the advice about what to do in January. Either you’ll still be sticking to your resolutions, food- and exercise-wise, or you will have already abandoned them – unless, like me, you didn’t make any, for which reason you will be currently neither glowing nor guilty. Regular readers will know that I like nothing more than to sit atop my spike; after the holidays, I could hardly wait to get back to work. But I also find the winter hard enough without depriving myself of things.Still, it was worse than ever this year: the advice, I mean. We were assailed from all sides, Veganuary joining Dry January as the latest thing. Looking over, if not exactly reading, an article in one newspaper – we’re all 3.3lb overweight, it said, and should drastically reduce our salt intake; we should also, in the interests of avoiding cancer, make sure our roast potatoes are golden yellow rather than brown – I was beset by the same anxiety I sometimes experience in a supermarket: even when it comes to self-improvement, the multiplicity of choice is overwhelming. Continue reading…

  • If the UK doesn’t act now, the car industry will vanish | Phillip Inman
    by Phillip Inman on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Brexit was the latest blow to the sector. Its future must not be left to the market – investment in electric vehicles is neededBritain’s economy is on course to grow by less than 1% in 2019. Last week’s retail sales figures for December, which showed the longest period of zero growth for more than 20 years, are likely to drag down GDP growth in the last quarter, limiting the annual growth rate to 0.8% or 0.9% at best.In 2020, the economy’s expansion may not be much better given all the uncertainty surrounding the government’s negotiating stance with the EU following Brexit. Few people inside Whitehall or even the cabinet know which industries will be sacrificed to achieve a quick and dirty trade deal. And while that situation persists business investment will remain low and the manufacturing sector will stumble along, possibly in recession as it is now. Continue reading…

  • The best home makeovers – it’s not all big windows and knocking through
    by Rowan Moore on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    The Don’t Move, Improve! awards celebrate London’s most innovative architectural home renovations, from twisting walls to chequerboard floorsArchaeologists of the future, should they find themselves sifting through the rubble of early 21st-century London, will find a distinctive layer. It will contain taps and door handles of Nordic design and manufacture, long sections of structural steel and the remnants of sliding glass doors. There might be chairs designed by mid-20th-century Danes, if they haven’t rotted away: by Arne Jacobsen in the older part of the layer, by Hans Wegner in the later.From this evidence the archaeologist will know that they are looking at a period that started around the dawn of the Blair era and continues until the present. It’s a long enough time – almost a generation – but one in which a remarkably consistent style of home improvement, a sort of metropolitan vernacular, has grown up. It is well represented in the shortlist for the Don’t Move, Improve! award for home makeovers, now in its 10th edition, and the subject of a forthcoming exhibition at the gallery space of New London Architecture. The winner will be announced on 11 February. Continue reading…

  • Children in care services are at ‘breaking point’
    by Michael Savage on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Major Tory donor urges comprehensive review into help for vulnerable youngstersServices for children in care are at “breaking point” because of poor outcomes and increasing pressures, a senior Tory peer has warned.Michael Farmer, a major Conservative donor who previously advised the government on prisons, says that a promised review of the care system must be far more comprehensive than previously envisaged. Continue reading…

  • Julian Lloyd Webber: I’ll quit top music job over arts cash cuts
    by Vanessa Thorpe on January 18, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Principal of acclaimed Birmingham conservatoire warns of London bias in culture fundingJulian Lloyd Webber, the former virtuoso cellist, is to step down from his job as principal of Birmingham’s music conservatoire if a block on national funding for his institution is not lifted.“I am not going to stay and watch all the things we have done going downhill. Why would I? You just can’t run a major institution in this hand-to-mouth way, from year to year,” he said this weekend, hoping his threat will prompt quick action and expose what he claims is a bias in favour of London-based music academies. Continue reading…

  • Brexit: Javid comments on non-alignment with EU prompt warnings of price rises
    by Lisa O’Carroll Brexit correspondent on January 18, 2020 at 4:59 pm

    Chancellor’s remarks represent ‘death knell for frictionless trade’, experts warnBusinesses have predicted price rises after the UK chancellor, Sajid Javid, said there would be no alignment with EU regulations once Britain’s exit from the European Union was made official.In what is being seen as an opening salvo in the next stage of negotiations, Javid said the Treasury would not lend support to manufacturers that favour EU rules as the sector had had three years to prepare for Britain’s transition. Continue reading…

  • Oprah Winfrey admits Russell Simmons pressured her over sexual abuse film
    by Associated Press in New York on January 18, 2020 at 4:59 pm

    Documentary On the Record details claims against rap mogulDirectors say Winfrey gave short notice of withdrawal from filmOprah Winfrey has said the rap mogul Russell Simmons attempted to pressure her over her involvement with a documentary in which several women detail alleged sexual abuse at his hands. But, Winfrey said, his efforts were not what prompted her to leave the project. Related: Alan Dershowitz: Trump impeachment acquittal would make me unhappy Continue reading…

  • BBC may waive gagging clauses of previous equal pay settlements
    by Aamna Mohdin on January 18, 2020 at 4:32 pm

    Move comes in wake of landmark Samira Ahmed case and amid increasing scrutiny of paying practices The BBC will consider waiving controversial confidentiality clauses that employees were previously forced to sign as part of settlements for equal pay disputes, amid rising scrutiny and in the wake of Samira Ahmed’s landmark tribunal victory against the broadcaster.Employees who brought complaints against the BBC before 2016 were required to sign non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) preventing them from discussing their settlement with colleagues, friends, or the media. Continue reading…

  • Rise and shine: five brilliant brunch recipes
    by Claire Ptak on January 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    Perfect dishes for lazy weekends: frittata with bacon salad, crepes with egg and ham, apple and custard brioche bunsBuckwheat flour is one of my favourite flours to bake with, it goes with both savoury and sweet so the toppings or fillings for these crepes are endless. This will probably make a few more crepes than you need but the mixture keeps well in the fridge for up to a week. Continue reading…

  • Norman conquest: an imaginatively restored French farmhouse
    by Emma J Page on January 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    With everything from running water to a new roof needed, the key to updating this once-derelict farm in Normandy was patienceWhen Vincent Dewas first came to view the farm that is now his Normandy home, several potential buyers had already been put off by its derelict condition. But one glance at the property and its adjoining outhouses, built in 1875, was all it took. “I didn’t need to go inside to make up my mind,” he says. “What sold it to me was its proportions, the extensive grounds and the fact it sits quietly in Le Perche national park, close to the village of Bellême, surrounded by trees and cows. I told the agent I wanted it and I signed the papers there and then on the bonnet of the car.”In France, we take the occupation of antique-hunting so seriously that we have a verb for it – chiner Continue reading…

  • Citizen Bravo, Raymond MacDonald and Friends: Return to Y’Hup: The World of Ivor Cutler review – charming tribute to a national treasure
    by Neil Spencer on January 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    (Chemikal Underground)Surveying Rip It Up, the National Museum of Scotland’s 2018 celebration of Caledonian pop, Matt Brennan and Raymond MacDonald noted a conspicuous absence: that of Glasgow-born Ivor Cutler. True, the late poet, songwriter and humorist wasn’t really pop – his minimalist verse was delivered in lowering tones to a wheezing first world war harmonium – but he became a cult figure, not least among Scots musicians, as testified by the stellar cast of this tribute, which includes members of Lau, Franz Ferdinand and Belle and Sebastian, along with folkies such as Karine Polwart.Its 26 tracks, many under two minutes, prove a lot of fun. Cutler’s work was by turns charming, pithy and mordant, but his delivery, the cadent voice and harmonium, was unvarying. Brennan and MacDonald mix it up; indie rock for Pickle Your Knees, 2-Tone reggae for Shut Up!, shimmering dream pop for Shoplifters, electro ambience for spoken-word recitals. Cutler, a lifelong member of the Noise Abatement Society, may not have approved. His solitary minor hit, Women of the World (“take over, because if you don’t the world will come to an end”), becomes a jaunty marching song. The intention, to affirm Cutler as a national treasure, succeeds beautifully. Continue reading…

  • Daniel Susskind: ‘Automation of jobs is one of the greatest questions of our time’
    by Ian Tucker on January 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    The Oxford economist talks about his new book on the challenges of a society with no traditional employmentDaniel Susskind is an economist and fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. He has held policy roles in the Blair and Cameron governments. His new book, A World Without Work, explores how society should respond to the increasing automation of employment.This isn’t an unexplored topic, so why did you write this book? My view is that this is one of the greatest questions of our time. And in spite of everything that has been written, I didn’t feel like we had done the question justice. I don’t think we’re taking seriously this idea that there might not be enough well-paid work for everyone to do because of technological advances that are taking place. Continue reading…

  • Elon Musk set to cash in at Tesla as deliveries and shares soar
    by Edward Helmore on January 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    The boss of the electric carmaker has a $50bn pay package ready to roll if the firm hits a $100bn valuationOne of the options on a fully loaded Tesla is “ludicrous mode”, a setting offering a 0-60mph acceleration time of 2.8 seconds for drivers who find its “insane mode” too sedate.To some investors, that’s similar to chief executive Elon Musk’s bonus package: if the electric carmaker’s share price goes above $554.80 – which would value the firm at $100bn, and which it came very close to last week – the mercurial entrepreneur could reap the first $350m instalment of a potential $50bn share-based pay package. Continue reading…

  • $1tn is just the start: why tech giants could double their market valuations
    by Rupert Neate on January 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    As Alphabet becomes the latest firm to achieve a 13-figure market cap, analysts still forecast years of growth aheadAlphabet, the tech giant formerly known as Google, on Thursday night became the fourth company in history to reach a trillion-dollar (£776bn) valuation. In less than 24 hours, some analysts were predicting that the company, founded in a messy Silicon Valley garage 21 years ago, could double in value again to become a $2tn firm “in the near future”.The consensus among Wall Street bankers is nothing can stop the runaway share price rises of Alphabet or the other so-called “Faang” tech companies. Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google have seen their combined market value increase by $1.3tn over the past year – that’s the equivalent of adding half the value of all the companies in the FTSE 100, or the entire GDP of Mexico. Continue reading…

  • Revealed: clandestine actions of mercenaries during Thatcher years
    by Jamie Doward on January 18, 2020 at 3:57 pm

    Keenie Meenie Services was active from Sri Lanka to Nicaragua – and Foreign Office could not rein it in, book claimsA British mercenary company established by former SAS veterans conducted clandestine and highly controversial operations around the world, with successive British governments either unwilling or unable to rein it in, a new book reveals.Keenie Meenie Services (KMS) was one of Britain’s first mercenary companies, believed to have taken its name from Arabic slang for “undercover”. It was set up in the 1970s and recruited veterans battle-hardened by the Troubles in Northern Ireland, Operation Storm in Oman – when Anglo Omani forces quashed an uprising – and the 1980 siege of London’s Iranian embassy. Continue reading…

  • Defi Du Seuil powers to victory in Ascot’s Clarence House Chase
    by Chris Cook at Ascot on January 18, 2020 at 3:54 pm

    • Barry Geraghty’s mount beats old rival Un De Sceaux• Ballyandy wins in photo for Haydock’s Champion Hurdle TrialDefi Du Seuil received what may be the ultimate compliment from Barry Geraghty who, unprompted, compared the horse to Moscow Flyer in the winner’s enclosure here. “Dazzling and breathtaking” was the jockey’s elated verdict after the pair kept their faultless season rolling with victory in the Clarence House Chase and Defi Du Seuil is now clear favourite for the Queen Mother Champion Chase.“I love riding him,” Geraghty said, pouring sincerity into an oft-used phrase with a lot of emphasis on the word “love”. “He’s not the biggest in the world but he has so much scope and just, he’s up for it. And that’s what you love with good two-mile chasers. Moscow Flyer wasn’t the biggest or the flashiest but he was up for it. And this lad is up for it.” Continue reading…

  • On my radar: Jonathan Coe’s cultural highlights
    by Jonathan Coe on January 18, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    The comic novelist on the genius of jazz organist Barbara Dennerlein, Spike Milligan’s Puckoon and his love of MunichBorn in Birmingham in 1961, Jonathan Coe studied at Cambridge and received a PhD in English literature from Warwick University, where he taught poetry. He published his first novel in 1987, gaining prominence with the 1994 Thatcher-era satire What a Carve Up!. He has won a number of awards including the 2005 Samuel Johnson prize, and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2012. Coe’s Middle England (2018), hailed as the “first great Brexit novel”, won the Costa novel award this month. Continue reading…

  • Bombshell review – redacted notes on a scandal
    by Simran Hans on January 18, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    A retelling of the Fox News sexual harassment case avoids inconvenient political truths“To get ahead, you gotta give a little head,” joked former chairman and chief executive of Fox News Roger Ailes, before the 76-year-old was brought to his knees by allegations of sexual harassment in 2016, one year before his death. When Gretchen Carlson (a fabulously brittle Nicole Kidman) files a lawsuit against Ailes (John Lithgow) after being dropped by the network, she inspires a wave of confessions from other women. This glossy portrayal of Ailes’s downfall secured Oscar nominations last week for Charlize Theron, as anchor Megyn Kelly, and Margot Robbie, as fictionalised “evangelical millennial” news producer Kayla Pospisil. The tale is current, its moment for telling ripe.Unfortunately the tone is all over the place. Direct to camera addresses, one-liners about sushi being “liberal food”, and Kate McKinnon’s closeted Democrat lesbian producer scan as satire. It’s grimly funny when fresh hire Rudi Bakhtiar (Nazanin Boniadi) details the mental gymnastics a woman must perform to save face when her boss invites himself up to her hotel room: “Just look confused,” says her inner monologue. Yet the performances are utterly earnest. The ambitious Kayla is pleased to score a meeting with Ailes, but Robbie’s wide eyes soon fill with hot tears as she is coerced and humiliated. Continue reading…

  • Alan Dershowitz: Trump impeachment acquittal would make me unhappy
    by Martin Pengelly in New York on January 18, 2020 at 2:59 pm

    Member of Trump’s legal team says he’s acting ‘for the survival of the constitution’ but will have limited role in president’s defenceImpeachment: is Trump set to survive and win a second term?The Harvard legal scholar Alan Dershowitz, a member of Donald Trump’s team for his impeachment trial, has said he will not vote for the president in November and that Trump’s acquittal by the Senate “would produce results that make me unhappy as an individual”. Related: How to dump Trump: Rick Wilson on Running Against the Devil Continue reading…

  • Varadkar insists Ireland is safe country after week of violent crime
    by PA Media on January 18, 2020 at 2:33 pm

    Ireland’s taoiseach defends record as crime takes centre stage in election campaignLeo Varadkar has insisted Ireland is a safe country following the murder of a teenager and a number of violent crimes in recent days.There has been a renewed focus on crime in the Irish general election campaign after the murder of 17-year-old Keane Mulready-Woods. The teenager was murdered and his body was dismembered and left in various locations in Dublin. Continue reading…

  • Gwyneth Paltrow has capitalized on vaginal shame and celebration | Arwa Mahdawi
    by Arwa Mahdawi on January 18, 2020 at 2:10 pm

    Why are vaginas suddenly everywhere? Partly because of the rise of ‘wellness’ – but also because they’re now a symbol of resistanceSign up for the Week in Patriarchy, a newsletter​ on feminism and sexism sent every Saturday. Continue reading…

  • Stellan Skarsgård: ‘I don’t give advice to my children’
    by James McMahon on January 18, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    The actor, 68, on dreaming of being a diplomat, smashing telephones with skill and the days before Marvel ruled the worldI intended to become a diplomat. That was my dream. I didn’t take acting seriously until I was 16 and got a role in a Swedish show that made me extremely famous right away. There were screaming girls, all that stuff. I’d never had any girl take an interest in me before that. Suddenly being a diplomat didn’t seem half as attractive as it had done. My heroes growing up were politicians. The main one was Dag Hammarskjöld, a Swedish politician who was the secretary general of the United Nations. He was a real hero for peace to many of my generation. I idolised him. Continue reading…

  • How Linder went from Orgasm Addict to Chatsworth House
    by Caroline Roux on January 18, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    The art maverick first made her name in the punk era with collages fusing fashion and pornography, and a major retrospective proves her work still provokesIt’s not easy to celebrate female sexuality and vaginas on public transport, but Linder, the British artist known for her uncompromising photomontages, managed it at Southwark Underground, a station that sees 16.7 million people pass through its barriers each year. The 85m-long billboard she installed there last November – a luscious and cinematic sequence of roses, lips, female faces, food and Roman votaries that emerged from research into local figures and places and the archive of London Transport – is called The Bower of Bliss. And that, as it happens, is a quaint old phrase for vagina. “It suddenly came back to me when I was filming at Chatsworth last year,” she says of the term she had first discovered years before in an issue of Oz magazine edited by Germaine Greer. The work is a reminder that women don’t just need safe spaces but joyful ones, too.Sex and pornography can loom large in the work of Linder. Among her best known are those where super-tanned 70s Playboy nudes are embellished with explosions of flowers; and naked women in coquettish poses have an electric heater, or a clock, or a Victoria sponge for a head. Linder, who changed the spelling of her first name as punk exploded in mid-70s Manchester (“It felt more European”), has been busy. She spent much of 2018 as artist-in-residence at Chatsworth House, digging through the history of that stately Derbyshire pile to create a film, an exhibition and even a fragrance. “It’s such a treasure house. There are parcels in the attic that have never been opened,” she says, though a more 20th-century discovery was Debo, Duchess of Devonshire’s adoration of Elvis. She also had an exhibition of her finely scalpelled montages at Nottingham Contemporary and created a film and a flag for Glasgow Women’s Library. Continue reading…

  • Johnny Marr joins Hans Zimmer to score next James Bond film
    by Aamna Mohdin on January 18, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    No Time to Die will be the 25th film in the franchise and Daniel Craig’s final role as 007Former Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr will join composer Hans Zimmer to score the upcoming James Bond movie No Time to Die.Zimmer, widely celebrated for his scores for films such as Gladiator, The Da Vinci Code and the Pirates of the Caribbean series, was drafted in as a last-minute replacement earlier this month. Continue reading…

  • Impeachment: is Trump set to survive and win a second term?
    by David Smith in Washington on January 18, 2020 at 12:22 pm

    As Democrats marched the articles to the Senate, the president basked in policy success. Many think re-election is comingIt was, the White House tweeted on Friday, “an incredible week” for Donald Trump. On that, no one could disagree. But what kind of incredible depended on which end of Pennsylvania Avenue you were standing. Related: How to dump Trump: Rick Wilson on Running Against the Devil Continue reading…

  • ‘You have to stand up to illegitimate authority’: what veteran abortion activists can teach us in the Trump era
    by Laura Barton on January 18, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    The pioneers who struggled for legalisation in the 60s are seeing the same battles being fought all over againThe telephone sat in the dormitory hallway, and when it rang it might have been for any of the residents – young women in their teens and early 20s, all students at the University of Chicago. Calls came from family and friends and boyfriends, from colleagues and classmates and clubs. But sometimes the voice at the end of the line would ask for “Jane”.This was 1965, and in Chicago the social justice movement was gathering pace – a new era that encompassed civil rights, student rights, women’s rights and resistance to the war in Vietnam. Among those involved was Heather Booth, a 19-year-old social sciences student from New York. Booth had spent the summer of 1964 in Mississippi, volunteering as part of the Freedom Summer project, an attempt to register as many African American voters as possible. It was an experience that had galvanised her and taught some valuable lessons: “One is that if you organise, even in what seem like the most hopeless circumstances, you can change the world,” she says. “Number two: sometimes you have to stand up to illegitimate authority.” Continue reading…

  • Chelsea look to bridge the gap against Arsenal and reboot WSL title push
    by Suzanne Wrack on January 18, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    Emma Hayes’ side have to win their game against the Gunners to have a realistic chance of overhauling the leadersIf Chelsea lose at Arsenal on Sunday, their bid for a third Women’s Super League title will take a heavy hit. Things are tight at the top and defeat would mean Emma Hayes’s third-placed team would slip seven points behind the reigning champions, albeit with a game in hand. “I know the opponent well and I know the manager, I suspect he will throw a few surprises at me,” says Hayes of Joe Montemurro and his team. “So how do you prepare for a surprise? I don’t know, but I’m sure I’ll be ready.”In a 12-team table it is harder to bridge such a gap. The problem for Chelsea is that should they fail to reclaim the crown Arsenal took from them, it will not have been lost in the head-to-head meetings with their title rivals. Instead, they will look back at the four dropped points to Brighton and Liverpool, who have 10 points between them after 12 and 11 games respectively, as the moments when the title slipped from their grasp. Continue reading…

  • Blair built on Thatcher’s legacy. That’s a simple fact | Phil McDuff
    by Phil McDuff on January 18, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    Labour MP Zarah Sultana’s comments linking the two provoked wrath. But why were they even controversial?In her maiden speech to the House of Commons, the new Labour MP for Coventry South, Zarah Sultana, said, “In 10 years’ time, at the start of the next decade, I want to look teenagers in the eye and say with pride: my generation faced 40 years of Thatcherism, and we ended it.” Related: Stuart Hall: New Labour has picked up where Thatcherism left off Continue reading…

  • ‘Hong Kong is at a crossroads’: inside prison with the student who took on Beijing
    by Joshua Wong on January 18, 2020 at 11:59 am

    Political activist Joshua Wong was 20 when he was sentenced in 2017 to six months for his role in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy ‘umbrella movement’The last words I said before I was taken away from the courtroom were: “Hong Kong people, carry on!” That sums up how I feel about our political struggle. Since Occupy Central – and the umbrella movement that succeeded it – ended without achieving its stated goal, Hong Kong has entered one of its most challenging chapters. Protesters coming out of a failed movement are overcome with disillusionment and powerlessness. Continue reading…

  • ‘The red wall is cracking’: Buttigieg gets ovation after expecting protests
    by Tom Cullen in Orange City, Iowa on January 18, 2020 at 11:00 am

    His campaign feared hostility in Iowa’s most conservative county. But the local response told a different storyPete Buttigieg knew he was foraying into unfriendly confines when he was en route to Orange City, the seat of Iowa’s most conservative county.The gay ex-mayor of South Bend, Indiana, may be in the top tier of Democratic presidential candidates seeking to win this vital first voting state next month, but his sexuality was seen as likely to be a major issue in this corner of the state, Sioux county. Continue reading…

  • ‘She said she’d be babysitting our embryo’: what’s it like to carry a child for a friend?
    by Deborah Linton on January 18, 2020 at 9:30 am

    Surrogacy between friends can be life-changing. The people who have done it talk emotions, legal hurdles – and WhatsApp birthing groupsIn a flat in north-east London, Abi is cradling her best friend’s baby. At 15 weeks old, the little boy is smiling up at her, testing out his first sounds. His mother, Rachel, prepares his bottle while Abi rocks him, showing all the love she would to any of her friends’ children. The only difference is that Abi gave birth to him.Abi and Rachel, both 35, met on their first day at university in Birmingham in 2003 and rarely left one another’s side. At 16, Rachel had been diagnosed with MRKH, a congenital condition meaning her uterus was undeveloped. Although she produced eggs, she would never be able to carry children, something she kept to herself. “I’d tell people I didn’t want kids but deep down I was insanely jealous,” says Rachel, who works as an events producer in London. “I wanted them so badly but assumed I’d never have my own, so I learned to live with it.” Continue reading…

  • ‘How to live and die well’: what I learned from working in an NHS hospice
    by Rachel Clarke on January 18, 2020 at 8:00 am

    Is there a good way to approach the end of life? Rachel Clarke, a palliative care doctor, believes there is – and that we can all learn from her patientsShe’s called Gemma. She’s three years old. She fell into a canal,” said a senior nurse. “By the time her parents managed to get her out, apparently she’d already stopped breathing.” “Paramedics three minutes away,” called another nurse, holding the scarlet phone on which emergencies were called through. With a grace and efficiency akin to choreography, a team of professionals who moments beforehand had been as disparate as atoms, dispersed across the hospital, were poised around an empty resuscitation bed, waiting as one to swing into action.The consultant quietly confirmed each team member’s role. The anaesthetist, responsible for airway. The scribe, who would note down, in meticulous detail, the timings, the drugs, the doses, every iota of care which, if we were lucky, might snatch life back from lifelessness. Doctor one, doctor two – the roles and responsibilities went on. Then, a moment of silence before the paramedics’ brute force pushed a trolley through the swing doors and there, tiny, limp and pale, lay a toddler, unmoving beneath the harsh fluorescent lights. Continue reading…

  • 20 photographs of the week
    by Jim Powell on January 18, 2020 at 8:00 am

    The erupting Taal volcano, bushfires in Australia, airstrikes in Syria and unrest in Lebanon – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week Continue reading…

  • Dakar Rally 2020: sand, flames and camels – in pictures
    by Steven Bloor on January 18, 2020 at 7:30 am

    This year’s rally is the 42nd edition of the event and the first edition held in Saudi Arabia. The 12 stages took competitors across 7,500 km, 75% of which will be over sand – from the shores of the Red Sea in Jeddah, around the canyons and mountains of the western part of the country, over the dunes of the Empty Quarter and all the way to the Qiddiya. Here we bring you some of our favourite images from this year’s Dakar Rally Click here to check out images of the rally from yesteryear Continue reading…

  • My happy place: where European locals immerse themselves in nature
    by Guardian Staff on January 18, 2020 at 7:00 am

    From hiking and cycling in the mountains to sitting in a serene spot, 12 people tell us where they unwind and find peace of mindJannet Aksnes, 46, from Flåm Continue reading…

  • The week in wildlife – in pictures
    by Eric Hilaire on January 17, 2020 at 8:26 pm

    The pick of the best flora and fauna photos from around the world, including an iguana and an injured leopard Continue reading…

  • Alan Dershowitz and Ken Starr join Trump impeachment legal team
    by Tom McCarthy in New York on January 17, 2020 at 5:26 pm

    Dershowitz is known for defending Jeffrey Epstein while Starr led the investigation that culminated in Bill Clinton’s impeachmentThe White House has unveiled Donald Trump’s legal team for his Senate impeachment trial, a list of attorneys whose own ageing controversies threaten to overshadow their efforts to defend the president.As the impeachment process enters a major new phase next week, Trump’s defense team will include Alan Dershowitz, known for defending the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, and Kenneth Starr, the dogged prosecutor who led the investigation that culminated in the 1998 impeachment of former president Bill Clinton and lost a university post in 2016 for mishandling sexual assaults on campus. Continue reading…

  • Schools ‘converting toilet blocks into isolation booths’
    by Sally Weale Education correspondent on January 17, 2020 at 5:01 pm

    Children’s commissioner describes ‘horror stories’ of children put in isolationSchools are converting toilet blocks and classrooms to build isolation booths to accommodate “disruptive” children, the children’s commissioner has said, as campaigners warn that excessive use of the practice could be putting young people’s mental health at risk.Anne Longfield said she had heard “horror stories” about children’s experiences in isolation booths – spaces in which pupils sit in silence for hours as punishment for breaking school rules and disruptive behaviour. Continue reading…

  • Share your experiences of once-in-a-lifetime jobs
    by Guardian community team and Katherine Purvis on January 17, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    After hundreds apply to run a café on a remote Irish island, we’d like to hear about your one-of-a-kind job experiences Do you dream of quitting the rat race and moving to a remote island to run a B&B, book shop or animal sanctuary? You’re not alone. From Alaska to South Africa, hundreds of people have responded to a posting to manage accommodation and a cafe on Ireland’s Great Blasket island.It’s the latest ‘dream job’ opportunity to attract applications from around the world, following posts for a barefoot bookseller in the Maldives and the chance to run a cat sanctuary on the Greek island of Syros. Continue reading…

  • Tell us about your cat disputes with your neighbours
    by Guardian community team on January 17, 2020 at 1:48 pm

    After one disagreement over a cat resulted in a £20,000 court case, we would like to hear about your experiencesCats: they love us, they hate us – they might even actually be genuinely attached to us.But having a cat can make life difficult – especially when it comes to relationships with our neighbours. One dispute over a Maine Coon in west London resulted in a £20,000 court case this week. Jackie and John Hall were perplexed when their cat Ozzy kept coming home with a new collar – they soon found out that he had been making himself at home with a neighbour, who now has an injunction against her that will ban her interacting with the cat. Continue reading…

  • What are you planning to do to mark Brexit day?
    by Guardian community team on January 17, 2020 at 12:44 pm

    We would like to hear what you are doing at 11pm on 31 January to mark the UK leaving the EUFriday 31 January is Brexit’s point of no return: the end of the article 50 process, which cannot be reversed. Many believe it will be decades before any attempt can be made to rejoin the EU.Brexiters were hoping to hold celebrations to the chimes of Big Ben at 11pm on the day the UK formally leaves the bloc , but what about those who are mourning the Britain’s departure after 47 years? Continue reading…

  • Bullfighting, dancing and spending big: a wedding in the Comoros – photo essay
    by Tommy Trenchard on January 17, 2020 at 7:00 am

    Marriage celebrations in these African islands routinely last two weeks and can cost tens of thousands of dollars. The average yearly income is $1200It’s late evening in the Comoros, a remote volcanic archipelago situated between Mozambique and Madagascar in the western Indian Ocean, and the residents of Domoni have gathered in great numbers around the edge of the town’s central square to celebrate the marriage of Badaant el Mounyrou and her husband Dhinourayni Ali Kassim Ali Mbaliya. Continue reading…

  • The fallout in Iran – podcast
    by Presented by Rachel Humphreys with Michael Safi and Nadia Whittome, produced by Rose de Larrabeiti, Courtney Yusuf and Axel Kacoutié; executive producers Nicole Jackson and Phil Maynard on January 17, 2020 at 3:00 am

    International correspondent Michael Safi discusses the mistakes and dangerous miscalculations that have been made by Iran in the wake of Qassem Suleimani’s death. And parliament’s youngest MP, Nadia Whittome, talks about her new roleGuardian international correspondent Michael Safi talks to Rachel Humphreys about the latest developments in Iran, following the US assassination of Iranian commander Qassem Suleimani. Iran has admitted that its military made an “unforgivable mistake” in unintentionally shooting down a Ukrainian jetliner and killing all 176 people on board, after days of rejecting western intelligence reports that pointed to Tehran being responsible. At the same time, Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, has warned that European soldiers in the Middle East could be in danger after the UK, France and Germany triggered a dispute mechanism in the nuclear agreement that could lead to the reimposition of international sanctions on the country. Continue reading…

  • How can we make award shows more diverse? – video explainer
    by Lanre Bakare Monika Cvorak Bruno Rinvolucri Nikhita Chulani on January 16, 2020 at 5:52 pm

    This year, both the Bafta and the Oscar nominations were met with widespread criticism for their lack of diversity, with the Oscars featuring only one person of colour and all the Bafta nominees being white. The Guardian’s arts and culture writer Lanre Bakare explores the history of controversy at some of the industry’s biggest award ceremonies and looks at what can be done to improve representationHow long can this nonsense of the Oscars failing to nominate female directors go on? | Ellen E JonesFrom Cats to The Goldfinch: Oscar-bait movies the Academy shunned in 2020Joker leads Oscars 2020 pack – but Academy just trumps Baftas for diversityContinue reading…

  • Lightning, volcanoes and protests: Thursday’s best photos
    by Compiled by Arnel Hecimovic on January 16, 2020 at 1:06 pm

    The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world Continue reading…

  • Why is UFC so popular with men? | Modern masculinity
    by Iman Amrani, Adam Sich, Grace Shutti, Paul Boyd, Tom Palliser, Ken Macfarlane, Ben Kape, Brendan Gilliam, James Turner, Michael Henaghan, Mike Gialloreto and Tom Silverstone on January 16, 2020 at 12:00 pm

    Iman Amrani is back with series two of Modern Masculinity. Episode one takes her to UFC 244 in New York. From open workouts with Darren Till to Jorge Masvidal vs Nate Diaz on fight night at Madison Square Garden, Iman speaks to fighters and fans about why MMA is growing in popularity with so many men, including Donald TrumpWatch Modern masculinity series one:Why Jordan Peterson is filling the void | episode 1Continue reading…

  • Share your thoughts on the new agriculture bill
    by Guardian community team on January 16, 2020 at 11:26 am

    We’d like to hear from farmers and those in the agriculture sector about what they think about the new bill After Brexit, the UK’s food security is to be regularly assessed by parliament to ensure minimal disruption to supplies while new trade deals are being sought, outlined in a new agriculture bill, introduced to parliament on Thursday.British agriculture is facing the biggest shakeup in 40 years, and the bill requires a regular report to MPs outlining supply sources and household expenditure on food, as well as consumer confidence in food safety. Continue reading…

  • Who can lead Labour back to government? – podcast
    by Presented by Anushka Asthana with Heather Stewart and John Abraham produced by Rachel Humphreys, Courtney Yusuf, Gregory Robinson and Axel Kacoutié; executive producers Phil Maynard and Nicole Jackson on January 16, 2020 at 3:00 am

    The race to succeed Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour party has been narrowed to five candidates this week. Political editor Heather Stewart looks at the challenge ahead for the party as it faces five more years of opposition. Plus: John Abraham on the historic warming of the oceans Labour MPs returned to Westminster minus 60 of their colleagues who lost their seats in last month’s election. With a sizeable Conservative majority, they know that victories in parliament will be sparse and instead are turning their attention to who should succeed Jeremy Corbyn as leader. The Guardian’s political editor, Heather Stewart, has been following the race in which five candidates have made it over the first procedural hurdle: Keir Starmer, Rebecca Long-Bailey, Lisa Nandy, Jess Phillips and Emily Thornberry. With a general election not due until 2024, the eventual winner will have time to formulate an opposition policy platform, but can they improve on the consecutive failures suffered by Gordon Brown, Ed Miliband and Jeremy Corbyn? Continue reading…

  • Where did it all go wrong for Harry and Meghan? – podcast
    by Presented by Anushka Asthana with Hadley Freeman and Dan Sabbagh; produced by Elizabeth Cassin, Courtney Yusuf and Axel Kacoutié; executive producers Nicole Jackson and Phil Maynard on January 15, 2020 at 3:00 am

    Hadley Freeman looks at why, 20 months after the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the couple no longer want to be full-time working members of the royal family. And: Dan Sabbagh on an unprecedented US intervention in the debate over Huawei Last week, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex made a bombshell announcement: that they were to “step back” from senior roles in the royal family and work towards financial self-sufficiency. The news has rocked the monarchy, raising complex questions – from taxpayers’ support for the royals to the future of the institution itself. The Guardian columnist Hadley Freeman talks to Anushka Asthana about the role she believes the media played in the couple’s apparent unhappiness with their current situation. Continue reading…

  • Can millennials get on the housing ladder without help? – video
    by Simon Roberts Ben Eager Ian Anderson Ryan Baxter Paul Boyd on January 7, 2020 at 3:34 pm

    In the UK, only one in four middle-income millennials are on the housing ladder. Twenty years ago,  65% of this group owned homes. What’s changed? Is it possible to buy a house without help? And with more people privately renting, what are the implications for starting families, retirement and society at large? We explore the numbers Continue reading…

  • Plants before pandas: the young botanist tackling extinction in his own backyard – video
    by Richard Sprenger, Noah Payne-Frank, Alex Healey and Katie Lamborn on January 6, 2020 at 12:37 pm

    Almost as rare as the plants he protects, 24-year-old Josh Styles is not your average botanist. In 2017 he founded the North West Rare Plant Initiative, a conservation project in his local region. His aim is to resurrect 44 plant species that are extinct or threatened with extinction in the area, aiding biodiversity and battling the climate crisis. Richard Sprenger went to meet him in his natural habitat – the sand dunes and peat bogs of north-west England – to see the impact his work is having and find out why, when the Amazon rainforest is on fire, it still matters We are supporting four charities this year that are harnessing the power of nature of the climate crisis, just like Josh in this video. Click here to donate Continue reading…

  • The veiled rapper breaking taboos for women in Senegal – video
    by Ricci Shryock Ekaterina Ochagavia and Katie Lamborn on December 31, 2019 at 11:39 am

    Mina La Voilée is a female rapper from Parcelles, Dakar, who is breaking taboos by rapping about women’s rights. As a woman who chooses to wear a veil, she explains how criticism from industry professionals who told her “the veil and hip hop don’t flow together” drove her to succeed, and inspired her to tackle other controversial societal issues in her lyrics such as child marriage, rape and infanticide. She performs both as a solo artist and as part of an all-female rap movement, Genji Hip Hop, who use their music to fight cultural stereotypes and gender violence’Rap does not shut up’: hip-hop women of SenegalContinue reading…

  • Dying young: ‘It’s not what you think’ – video
    by Leah Green Shay Notelovitz Ben Kape Simon Roberts Paul Boyd on December 19, 2019 at 11:23 am

    Joe is 34 and is facing his own death. He was given a terminal cancer diagnosis and has already lived longer than doctors predicted. He tells Leah how dying was nothing like he had anticipated, and he and his friends discuss the impact this unexpected turn has had on how they view life Continue reading…

  • Electric vehicles: Can they make drivers happier, calmer and less stressed?
    by Kieran Alger on December 18, 2019 at 11:36 am

    EVs mean cleaner cities, but could they improve the experience for drivers too? One ground-breaking partnership piloted by Audi and Addison Lee Group uncovered some surprising benefits to going electricFor companies that rely on fleet vehicles, change is inevitable. A raft of green policies have introduced zero-emissions targets, along with financial incentives encouraging businesses to adopt cleaner cars and vans, such as no vehicle tax for electric company cars in 2020/21.However, as well as helping the planet and improving a company’s bottom line, the “greening” of vehicle fleets by going fully electric could bring additional benefits. A recent widely reported study found that jumping behind the wheel of an electric car – rather than a traditional petrol or diesel – could also make drivers happier, calmer and less stressed too. Continue reading…

  • My homeless brother died on the streets of Glasgow. Who will be next? – video 
    by Kyri Evangelou, Maeve Shearlaw and Katie Lamborn on December 10, 2019 at 6:00 am

    Mark Starr died on the streets of Glasgow earlier this year; his family found out five weeks later on social media. As part of the Guardian’s empty doorway series we retraced his final steps alongside his brother Tony. Did Mark have friends? Did anyone give him support? And how hard is it to be homeless in Glasgow?  Continue reading…

  • Understated beauty: ‘Great brands have one big idea that chimes with people’
    on November 25, 2019 at 3:34 pm

    For a brand such as Audi, form really does follow function – which translates into designs that instill a sense of reliability, efficiency and trustIt was the audacious simplicity of it. At last year’s Milan Design Week, a giant ring was suspended inside the courtyard of the city’s Seminario Arcivescovile, a seminary that was built in 1564.Ma Yansong, the founder of MAD Architects, which developed the installation with Audi, explained the thinking behind it: “The illuminated ring in the square boundary of the historical courtyard stands for mankind’s strive for perfection.” Continue reading…

  • From classrooms to cars: when digital savviness trumps tech fads
    by Senay Boztas on November 19, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Businesses can avoid innovation just for innovation’s sake by having a strong sense of purpose. We take a look at some of the trailblazersIt seems almost obligatory these days for businesses to refashion themselves as tech companies. Products or services are reimagined as “digital solutions” with little regard to whether a digital solution is even actually necessary. As a result, businesses can end up adopting tech just for tech’s sake.This is why it can be so instructive to consider real-life businesses that have responded to hyped-up tech trends with savviness rather than faddishness. Continue reading…

  • What makes a modern leader: the secret to understated confidence
    by Rhymer Rigby on October 17, 2019 at 2:17 pm

    Rather than viewing leadership as a single trait, it’s probably best to think of it as a collection of qualities of varying importanceThere’s a lot of nonsense talked about leadership at work. We tend to fixate on high-profile individuals who are charismatic and very good at self-promotion rather than asking ourselves what really makes a leader. Arguably, this is why so many celebrated business leaders have their status radically (and usually negatively) reevaluated a few years after they step down.Moreover, as modern business norms evolve, effective leaders need to balance the need for boldness and self-assuredness with greater humility and approachability, exuding a more understated kind of confidence that can be difficult to define. Continue reading…

Be the first to comment on "Opinion Drama"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*